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Child Car Seats Filled With Toxins: A List of the Best and Worst

britax, carseats

Safety restraints are mandatory, but lots of them contain dangerous chemicals. Here's a list of the best and the worst.

They might save lives in car accidents, but a majority of kid car seats contain some pretty toxic chemicals.

An environmental non-profit found that more than half of the 2011 car seat models contained at least one hazardous chemical. Researchers at healthystuff.org found tested 150 car seats and found 60 percent test positive for brominated flame retardants, arsenic, lead, cadmium or mercury.

Believe it or not, this is good news.

The researchers found that the car seats tested fared much better than in previous years.

The environmental group that runs Healthystuff.org, The Ecology Center, said consumer complaints about the chemicals drove manufacturers to produce healthier products.

The testing involved X-ray analyzers, which tested only for the presence of these chemicals and did not determine how much, if any, came off on kids who use the seats. The group listed a best and worst group of seats, reprinted from CNN.com below:

Best Infant Seats: Chicco KeyFit 30 in Limonata, Graco Snugride 35 in Laguna Bay, and Combi Shuttle 33 in Cranberry Noche.

Best Convertible Car Seats: Graco Comfort Sport in Caleo, Graco MyRide 65 in Chandler and Streamer, Safety 1st Onside Air in Clearwater, and Graco Nautilus Elite 3-in-1 in Gabe.

Best Booster Seat: Graco Turbo Booster in Anders.

Worst Infant Seats: Graco Snugride 35 in Edgemont Red/Black, Graco Snugride 30 in Asprey.

Worst Convertible Seats: Britax Marathon 70 in Jet Set, and Britax Marathon in Platinum.

Worst Booster Seats: Recaro Pro Booster  in Blue Opal, and Recaro ProSPORT Toddler in Misty.

Healthystuff.org listed the Graco Snugride 35 in both the best and worst performers for infant car seats, possibly because of the different fabrics.

Photo: jimlavin via flickr

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