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Chinese Baby Survives Chopsticks Stuck in His Skull

324608_1219Dear children:  There is a reason why I annoy you with all those warnings not to run with scissors/pencils/sharp sticks.  And this is it.

A 14-month-old Chinese boy is being described as “lucky” after a chopstick was removed from his skull.  The toddler was playing with the chopsticks when he fell, and the stick went up his nose and actually made its way 4 cm into his brain.

“I was washing dishes. I rushed in and saw him lying on the ground. He couldn’t stop crying and I noticed a chopstick stuck in his nose,” Li Jingchao’s mother, Zhao Guilu, told CNN. She grabbed the baby and rushed him to the doctor, who told them they’d have to drive to a Beijing hospital, hours away.

“I thought at that time, it is all over, my boy will die,” they boys father, Li Guanglai, told CNN. “During the 10 hours of driving I felt depressed. I could barely breathe. I looked at my boy and his right side was numb. He was paralyzed.”

The harrowing situation has a happy ending, thankfully, but barely. Doctors say that had the chopstick entered the brain at even a slightly different location, or if it had gone in deeper, the boy could have been paralyzed or even died.

A couple of years ago, doctors removed a piece of pencil that a woman had stuck in her brain for 55 years. She fell over carrying a pencil when she was four, and doctors were afraid to remove the small piece lodged in her brain.

Let this be a lesson to you, children. Please.

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