Couple Stuck with Million Dollar Hospital Bill After Their Daughter was Born

Piper Kan.

Call her the real-life Million Dollar Baby because that’s how much one couple is expected to pay for the birth of their daughter.

As Yahoo reports, Australian couple John Kan and Rachel Evans were vacationing in Vancouver when she went into premature labor at the airport.

However, the couple had taken out travel insurance and extra coverage for Evans’ pregnancy which they thought covered them for unexpected events.  They didn’t know the policy would not cover the birth or the baby.

And you thought your hospital bill was bad…

Little Piper Kan stayed in the neo-natal ward of the B.C. Women’s Hospital and Health Centre for three months.  At a cost of $8,000 a day, the total bill ended up being about $1 million.  The couple was able to negotiate a payment plan (I would hope so!) where they pay about $300 a month, which, if you aren’t as good at math as I am let me summarize:  that’ll take nearly 300 years to pay off.

Evans says she’s not upset about the bill because their daughter is alive and healthy.

“Financially, it’s not so good but you can’t put a price on it,” she told the newspaper.

Australia’s foreign affairs minister is looking into the case although it is unclear what it could offer.  The Herald in Sydney reports the country’s Dept. of Health and Aging will reportedly investigate whether it could pay the bill.

Evans says she is grateful for any help the government might be able to provide.

“We don’t feel our mistake was someone else’s responsibility but obviously it is quite a large amount so any assistance we can get would be helpful.”

What do you think?  Should the government intervene because the bill is so insane or is it the couple’s fault for not checking the fine print of their insurance policy?

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