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Court Says No Child Support for Sperm Donor Kids

sperm-largeThe mother of twins born via insemination with sperm from a donor bank has lost a bid to get child support from the anonymous sperm donor.

Anyone else saying “well, thank heavens?”

According to the Boston Herald, the woman identified only as Jane Doe by court papers knows only that her kids’ father was a medical student who donated sperm in the early ’90s. The man signed an agreement that his identity remain “in the strictest confidence.”

Now the mom wants not only his identity but his medical records because her kids are sick, and his financial help in caring for them.

The medical records I get – in fact that’s something that should be standard in any sperm banking deal, just as it should in any adoption. I can’t count how many adopted parents I know who went through stress during pregnancy over what their unknown genetics might mean for their kids.

But the funny thing about artificial insemination via a sperm donor is that it doesn’t actually take two people. It takes a woman who decides she wants to be a parent, and as such is supposed to be ready for the committment it takes to do it alone (or with a partner of her choice). Not being able to afford the care of sick twins is very literally her problem – or one of her own creation, anyway.

Since this man (I won’t say father because he really isn’t one) donated, the sperm bank has changed its rules to allow men to waive their right to privacy – giving kids a chance to get a sense of their history. But that’s limited to when a child reaches eighteen – a date I’d imagine was set to protect the men from child support claims like this one.

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