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Dad Threatens to Hit Son for Buying Purple Video Game Controller

children and gender, bullying

Why get angry over something so insignificant?

A 20-year-old Tumblr user named Kristen who lives in North Carolina and works at Gamestop while attending college has written the latest defense of boys-liking-girl-stuff in a post that’s gone viral on the site and Facebook. “Dear Customer Who Stuck Up for his Little Brother” has over 26,000 notes on Tumblr and over 3,000 likes on Facebook.

In the post, Kristen tells the tale of two brothers, a “tall, stocky and handsome” high school wrestler and his “scrawny, neat, and very clean” tween sibling. She writes, “They were talking about finding a game for the younger one, and he was absolutely insisting it be one with a female character. I don’t know how many of y’all play games, but that isn’t exactly easy. Eventually, I helped the brothers pick a game called Mirror’s Edge. The youngest was pretty excited about the game, and then he specifically asked me…

‘Do you have any girl color controllers?’ I directed him to the only colored controllers we have which includes pink and purple ones. He grabbed the purple one, and informed me purple was his FAVORITE.”

Their father intervenes and tells the younger child to choose something else. “Something with guns and fighting, and certainly not a purple controller.” The young boy tells his Dad he doesn’t want to buy zombie game Dead Island and his father threatens to hit him.

Kristen says, “That’s when big brother stepped in. He said to his Dad “It’s my money, it’s my gift to him, if it’s what he wants I’m getting it for him, and if your going to hit anyone for it, it’s going to be me.” Dad just gives his oldest son a strong stern stare down, and then leaves the store.”

I won’t ruin the whole post for you by telling you what happens next, go read it yourself. It’s easy to see why people responded so warmly to Kristen’s thoughtful reaction to that moment. She and the boys in the story are proof that it really only takes a second to be a hero.

 

How does the Princess Culture affect boys?

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