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Dad Turns in His Own Kid For Drugs

handcuffsA father has turned in his own teenaged daughter for growing pot inside the family home.

The sixteen-year-old girl kept her closet locked – which she told dear old Dad was a move to keep her siblings from borrowing her clothes (not a bad excuse, we’ll give her that). But according to Click On Detroit, when he decided to try his key against the lock, he found it didn’t work.

He got suspicious – and somehow got the closet door open. Inside was a marijuana plant and items necessary for growing. Good Dad for being on top of things, but his next step is controversial: he called the cops. Now the teenager is facing charges.

If she’s treated as a juvenile (and currently it’s in the hands of the juvenile unit of the police department), there’s a chance that she’ll be punished, learn her lesson and the matter will be sealed. On the other hand, it could remain open book, and she could be haunted by a teenage indiscretion for the rest of her life. Prospective employers don’t like seeing a drug arrest on your record.

So what’s a parent to do? If you’re teen’s out of control – and growing drugs in her bedroom would seem to fall under that umbrella – action is always the best policy. Police action has a sobering affect that parental punishment simply can’t achieve. Chances are, it will straighten her out.

But it’s still calling police in to take over the parents’ role in discipline, and it could have a devastating affect on her future. What’s more – in the grand scheme of things, growing pot is not on par with say murder or rape. It’s not legal, no question, but it’s a very personal problem that won’t likely hurt anyone else.

It’s a roll of the dice – what would you do? Would you call the cops on your kid for drugs?

Image: notsogoodphotography via flickr

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