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Dessert for Breakfast: 10 Most Sugary Kids Cereals

Some cereals have more sugar than Chips Ahoy cookies!

Cereal. Kids love it. It’s the highlight of every trip to the grocery store for children …  and mom’s nightmare.

When I was growing up we were each allowed to pick out one box of cereal per month and keep it in our room. We could ration it as best we wanted but when it was gone we had to hop on board the giant bagged cereal program. You know, the cheap stuff.

Regardless of whether it was in a box or bag, we always went for the sugary stuff.

Now, as Shine from Yahoo reports, if your kid is eating cereal in the morning, your kid is basically eating dessert for breakfast.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE TOP TEN MOST SUGARY CEREALS.  You’ll be surprised!

As Yahoo reports:

According to a new report on sugar in children’s cereals published by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), more than half of the 84 brands tested contained at least 12 grams of sugar, or the equivalent of three teaspoons, per serving. That’s more sugar than three Chips Ahoy! cookies. Moreover, only one out of four cereals tested met the federal government’s proposed guidelines for food nutritious enough to be marketed to children.

Here are the worst offenders:

10 worst children’s cereals (based on sugar by weight)

1. Kellogg’s Honey Smacks (55.6% sugar)

2. Post Golden Crisps (51.9% sugar)

3. Kellogg’s Froot Loops Marshmallow (48.3% sugar)

4. Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch’s OOPS! All Berries (46.9% sugar)

5. Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch Original (44.4% sugar)

6. Quaker Oats Oh!s (44.4% sugar)

7. Kellogg’s Smorz (43.3% sugar)

8. Kellogg’s Apple Jacks (42.9% sugar)

9. Quaker Oats Cap’n Crunch Berries (42.3% sugar)

10 Kellogg’s Froot Loops Original (41.4% sugar)

To find out which cereals meet the government’s nutritional guidelines (and there are some good ones!) click on over to Yahoo.

So which cereal reigns supreme in your household? Is it on the list?

Plus, check out the 10 most unhealthy “health” foods for kids

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