Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Diet Soda Expands Waistline and Spikes Blood Sugar Levels, Says Study

diet soda, diet soda effects, expanded waistlines diet soda, high blood sugar diet soda, mom health

Soda is soda, and none of it is good, says new research.

Before you order another diet soda, you might want to rethink your beverage selection. The popular beverage is being blamed for even more health hazards and believed to be just as damaging as its sugar laden partner.

Of course, most of us know that diet soda has no nutritional value but now researchers are saying the soft drink dangerously bloats waistlines and may boost blood-sugar levels.

According to a study done by the University of Texas medical school, people who drink diet soda experienced a 70 percent greater increase in waist circumference over a decade than non-users.

Researcher Sharon Fowler explained how in a NY Post article:

“The more diet sodas people drank, the more their waists grew. For people who drink two or more diet sodas a day, their waist increase was five times those who drank no diet sodas, almost two inches.”

Now here’s where it gets ironic. Some scientists say that artificial sweeteners actually trigger the appetite, or possibly inhibit brain cells that signal the feeling of being full. In addition, University of Texas researchers discovered that the artificial sweetener, aspartame boosts blood-sugar levels.

It’s not the first time that diet soda is getting a bad rap. Earlier this year, diet soda was linked diet soda to an increased risk of stroke and heart attack.

But like many also say, perhaps people who drink diet soda feel they can splurge in other ways since they saved calories on their beverage and that is what accounts for the bigger waistlines and high blood sugar.

Would this study or any other recent studies on diet soda make you give it up for good? Do you ever let your kids drink diet soda?

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest