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Dylan Klebold's Mother Shares Her Story in "O" Magazine

columbine-hope-libraryIn the November issue of “O” magazine, Dylan Klebold’s mother, Susan Klebold, chillingly describes the last time she spoke to her son, shortly before he and friend Eric Harris attacked and killed 12 students and a teacher at Columbine High School, before turning the guns on themselves.

“Early on April 20, I was getting dressed for work when I heard Dylan bound down the stairs and open the front door. Wondering why he was in such a hurry when he could have slept another 20 minutes, I poked my head out of the bedroom. ‘Dyl?’ All he said was ‘Bye.’ The front door slammed, and his car sped down the driveway. His voice had sounded sharp. I figured he was mad because he’d had to get up early to give someone a lift to class. I had no idea that I had just heard his voice for the last time.”

Her words are part of an essay she wrote for the magazine after years of declining interviews with the media, reports the Denver Post.  She wasn’t paid for the essay, but hopes that her will bring awareness to suicide prevention.

Klebold talks of reading her son’s journals, which “broke her heart.”  Criminal psychologists told her that her son was “depressed and suicidal,” and Klebold says his role in the massacare was “impossible to accept” until she began to connect it to his mental illness.

She also wrote of the pain she feels for the victims of the massacre:

“For the rest of my life, I will be haunted by the horror and anguish Dylan caused.  I cannot look at a child in a grocery store or on the street without thinking about how my son’s schoolmates spent the last moments of their lives. Dylan changed everything I believed about myself, about God, about family, and about love.”

The Klebolds’ attorney said that they won’t be making any more statements to the media or giving out future interviews.  The November issue of “O” is on newsstands now.

Photo: McNamara Images, Flickr

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