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Eye Power! Mom Creates Superhero Line for Kids Who Wear Eye Patches and Glasses

Eye Power! Mom Creates Superhero Line for Kids Who Wear Eye Patches and Glasses - Babble

Garrett, 2, models a t-shirt and cape from Eye Power Kid’s Wear. Garrett was born with congenital cataracts in both eyes.

When Jessica Butler’s son Scott was four weeks old, he started wearing a contact lens. Scott was born with a congenital cataract in his left eye, so doctors had to surgically remove the lens in his eye. Until he’s old enough for a lens implant, he’ll need to wear a contact lens to protect his eye and eyeglasses to correct his vision. Jessica also has to “patch” Scott’s other eye for six hours a day in order to help maintain good vision development in his cataract eye.

Besides dealing with endless appointments, lens fittings, and prescriptions (not to mention putting a contact lens in a baby’s eye every day!), the Butler family also fields tons of curious questions and gets plenty of stares.

Jessica, a graphic designer, came up with the idea for Eye Power Kid’s Wear — cool, kid-friendly t-shirts that would make kids feel good about glasses and patches.

Eye Power! Mom Creates Superhero Line for Kids Who Wear Eye Patches and Glasses - Babble

Jessica Butler’s son Scott is wearing the “Will Patch for Cake” design.

“I want Scott and all those other kids out there in glasses/contacts and patches to grow up feeling cool!” Jessica writes on her website. “I want them to be proud of their glasses because glasses are AWESOME! I want kids who don’t wear glasses to wish they did.”

Jessica’s idea has definitely resonated with other families, many of whom contributed to a Kickstarter fund to launch Eye Power.

“The shirts are a great conversation starter when strangers ask if my kids’ glasses are real, or why they need them,” said mom Meghan Wismer, who contributed to the Kickstarter fund.

“It really helps bring awareness that there are some major eye conditions that can affect every aspect of a kid’s life,” said Meghan, whose daughter and son were both born with bilateral congenital cataracts. “Plus, they’re super cool, and who wouldn’t want to wear a cape?”

I totally get it. My son had strabismus when he was really little, which meant his eyes would involuntarily turn inward. After months of wearing an eye patch, he underwent delicate surgery on both eyes. Patching was a huge challenge — it’s not the kind of thing toddlers naturally enjoy.

My son now wears glasses to correct his vision — nearsighted in one eye, farsighted in the other, and astigmatism in both. Jessica Butler’s designs — featuring things like bespectacled robots, monsters, and cupcakes — definitely up the cool factor of glasses for kids.

Read more from Joslyn on Babble and at her blog, stark. raving. mad. mommy. You can also follow Joslyn on FacebookTwitter, and Pinterest.

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