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Families Rejoice Over FDA Approval of New Head Lice Treatment

head lice, lice treatment

Lice, the most unwelcome house guests ever.

If you’ve ever battled a multi-kid lice infestation — and when I refer to you, I’m really thinking only about ME — you know how bad life can suck. Especially if your kids tend to have thick, lice-colored hair, hair that they inherited from you (again, ME), hair that — surprise! — isn’t impervious to infestation just because you/me never once, ever, ever, ever, got lice as a kid.

There are several different ways to treat lice, most requiring more than one treatment and/or copious amounts of dragging a teeny tiny comb through aforementioned thick (long!) hair, often to the tune of a sensitive child’s screams about pulling/scraping/boredom (like it’s fun for me, kid! Now sit still …)

Okay, so good news (sort of).

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a new (prescription only — that’s the bad news) lice treatment that, in some trials, cleared “heavy infestations” with one treatment. No nit-combing!

Natroba Topical Suspension hair rinse went on sale last month. Lice ingest the rinse’s main insecticide, Spinosad, and begin to shake until they exhaust themselves to death. (A fate they totally deserve, PS).

You’re still supposed to try a conventional lice treatment like Rid first, but your pediatrician can prescribe this if it doesn’t work. The cost, according to NBC.com is much higher, especially if you don’t have insurance:

Natroba costs the average family about $36 when covered by insurance, or $219 without coverage. Meanwhile, a family pack of Nix lice treatment sells for about $15.

Still, if you’re falling apart it might be worth it. Especially if you’re experiencing infestations that have become resistant to the insecticides in Rid.

There are, of course, many other ways to treat lice that don’t involve pesticides. But sometimes? You just want to kill them and move on. (Of course, I’m talking about me.)

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