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One Family, Two Planes, One Tragic Crash

airfranceb7472003750pixWhen the Schnabl family planned a vacation to Sweden, rather than all fly together they split up: Christine Badre Schnabl and her 5-year-old son Philipe took one flight, her husband and other child took a separate flight. Christine and her husband traveled this way to ensure that some part of their family would survive should the unthinkable happen.

Unfortunately, the unthinkable happened to Christine and Philipe. The two are presumed dead after their plane, Air France Flight 447, disappeared while en route from Rio de Janeiro to Paris. Christine’s husband and other child are safe.

I’ve heard of families who do this, and I can’t say I’ve ever been tempted. Aside from the fact that the odds of dying in an airplane crash are so remote, I’m simply not concerned with our family legacy living on. I want my family to live on, of course, all five of us. But pit the hassle of traveling separately against the faintest chance that the worst can happen, and I’ll take my chances.

And then there’s the guilt. I simply cannot imagine what Mr. Schnabl is going through right now, knowing that it just as easily could have been him on that flight. I don’t think I could live with having to make that choice, deciding which of my kids and which adult would go on each flight.

You could argue that because they chose to fly separately, half of their family was saved. But you could also argue that if the entire family had chosen to fly together on the other flight, they’d all be saved.

Of course, hindsight is 20/20. This is a tragic story, no matter how you look at it, for everyone who lost their lives on that flight.

I do wonder, however, if families who make it a point not to fly together, also make it a point not to drive together. As those of us who hate to fly have heard countless times, the odds of dying in a car crash are far greater than dying in a plane crash.

What do you think about families flying separately? Do you do it?

Source: The Mommy Files

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