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Food Fibs: The Lies We Tell Our Kids

Parents don’t always tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth to their kids.  In fact, some of us are pretty adept when it comes to lying in order to get our kids to do what we want them to do.  And nowhere are our fibs more fantastic than at the dinner table.  Whether we are trying to convince a picky eater to try a new food or to lay off a favorite one, breaking out the bogus is sometimes the easiest way to get our way.

CNN’s Eatocracy knows what I’m talking about.  They’ve polled colleagues and friends to find out how they bend the truth when it comes to kids and food.  Some of these we’ve heard before.  In fact, my own mother told me the one about swallowed gum staying in your stomach for seven years.  Apparently, that is not true.  And who didn’t grow up thinking that swallowed watermelon seeds would grow in your stomach?

Oddly enough, bread crusts seem to be the cause of many a tall tale.  Eating it will make your hair curly.  All the nutrients are in there.  It helps you whistle (like birds, get it?)

My own kid believes that chocolate will make her skin break out and that caffeine consumed after 3 pm will cause nightmares.  A colleague here at Strollerderby has convinced her kids that eating foods that contain “fake sugar” will make them throw up.  What food fibs have you told your kids?

Image: DMJarvey/Flickr

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