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From a Hungry Caterpillar to a Lonely Firefly: 23 of Eric Carles Most Iconic Images

The Grouchy Ladybug

The Grouchy Ladybug

Eric Carle has illustrated more than 70 books, which have sold over 100 million copies. But ask any kid who dreams of a very hungry caterpillar turning into a big, beautiful butterfly, and Carle’s work is about his wildly imaginative stories and gorgeous, vivid illustrations, not numbers.

Later this year, the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Mass., will celebrate 10 years of being a “vital center for artists, writers, teachers, librarians, scholars, and families — a place where important conversation about the future of art, books, and education happen every day.”

In celebration of the museum’s 10th anniversary as a place that “celebrate picture books and inspires a love of art reading,” enjoy 23 of Eric Carle’s most celebrated images with your kids:

 


  • Animals, Animals 1 of 23
    Animals, Animals
    A generously illustrated collection of poems by a variety of authors, describing the peculiarities and charms of pets as well as both wild and domestic animals. Eric Carle is noted for his depiction of animals and this colorful anthology contains some of his finest works.
    Animals, Animals compiled by Laura Whipple, Illustrated by Eric Carle. Illustration Copyright ©1989 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar 2 of 23
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar
    This all-time favorite not only follows the very hungry caterpillar as it grows from egg to cocoon to beautiful butterfly, but also teaches the days of the week, counting, good nutrition and more. Striking pictures and cleverly die-cut pages offer interactive fun.
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar By Eric Carle. Copyright ©1969 and 1987 by Eric Carle.
  • Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? 3 of 23
    Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See?
    Join Baby Bear as he sets out to look for his beloved Mama Bear, meeting a diverse cast of North American animals along the way. Readers of all ages will enjoy the rich, colorful illustrations and heartfelt story of this last collaboration in a series that has helped millions learn to read.
    Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? By Eric Carle. Copyright ©2007 by Eric Carle.
  • Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? 4 of 23
    Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?
    Appealing animals in bold colors are seen and named in a rhyming question-and-response text that delights as it invites young readers and listeners to participate actively.
    Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? Written by Bill Martin Jr., Illustrated by Eric Carle. Illustration Copyright ©1967 by Eric Carle.
  • The Mixed-Up Chameleon 5 of 23
    The Mixed-Up Chameleon
    Hilarious pictures show what happens when a bored chameleon wishes it could be more like other animals, but is finally convinced it would rather just be itself. An imagination-stretcher for children.
    The Mixed-Up Chameleon by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1975 by Eric Carle.
  • Dream Snow 6 of 23
    Dream Snow
    It's Christmas Eve, and an old farmer settles down for nap, wondering how Christmas can come when it hasn't snowed yet. The farmer falls asleep and in his dream, he imagines snowflakes covering him and his animals. He awakens to discover it really has snowed. A surprise at the end of the book makes this a truly magical Christmas.
    Dream Snow by Eric Carle. Copyright ©2000 by Eric Carle.
  • The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse 7 of 23
    The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse
    As the book progresses, the colors of the animals stray farther and farther from reality (there's a purple fox and a polka-dot donkey), all but daring readers to think outside the box. "I am a good artist," the man declares in closing, expressing the satisfaction that comes from using one's creative powers to the fullest.
    - Publishers Weekly, October, 2011
    The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse by Eric Carle. Copyright ©2011 by Eric Carle.
  • The Grouchy Ladybug 8 of 23
    The Grouchy Ladybug
    A grouchy ladybug who is looking for a fight challenges everyone it meets regardless of their size or strength. How this bumptious bug gets its comeuppance and learns the pleasures to be gained by cheerfulness and good manners is an amusing lesson in social behavior.
    The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1977 by Eric Carle.
  • A House for Hermit Crab 9 of 23
    A House for Hermit Crab
    An underwater fantasy based on the true habits of hermit crabs and the flora and fauna of their marine environment, this book offers young readers an interesting first introduction to marine biology as well as an appealing story of Hermit Crab's search for a house he can really call his home, as he grows throughout one year's cycle.
    A House for Hermit Crab by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1987 by Eric Carle.
  • Today Is Monday 10 of 23
    Today Is Monday
    Based on the well-known children's song, funny, full-color pictures show the foods featured for each day of the week. In a thoughtful new ending to the familiar text, all the world's children are invited on Sunday to come and eat it up.
    Today Is Monday by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1993 by Eric Carle.
  • Today is Monday 11 of 23
    Today is Monday
    "With exuberant childlike energy, Eric Carle has created an irresistible menagerie to tell the story of the long-loved children's rhyme introducing the days of the week. Even the youngest child (ages 3-7) will delight in the rhythmic text and vibrant illustrations that make illustrated in full color by Eric Carle, Today is Monday sure to be a favorite at bedtime, storytime—anytime!"
    - The Children's Bookwatch, March 1993
    Today Is Monday by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1993 by Eric Carle.
  • Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? 12 of 23
    Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See?
    Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? is told from the point of view of endangered creatures, and one dreaming child; each page a tribute to wild animals and their freedom.
    Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? Written by Bill Martin Jr., Illustrated by Eric Carle. Illustration Copyright ©2003 by Eric Carle.
  • Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? 13 of 23
    Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?
    Easy, repetitive question-and-response text draws children into joyful interaction as they imitate the sounds of a variety of zoo animals for the zookeeper.
    Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? Written by Bill Martin Jr., Illustrated by Eric Carle. Illustration Copyright ©1991 by Eric Carle.
  • Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? 14 of 23
    Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear?
    Big, bold animal illustrations and lots of noisy fun.
    Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? Written by Bill Martin Jr., Illustrated by Eric Carle. Illustration Copyright ©1991 by Eric Carle.
  • Mister Seahorse 15 of 23
    Mister Seahorse
    Mister Seahorse and fellow fish fathers who care for their soon-to-be-hatched offspring, share their stories while acetate pages reveal camouflaged creatures who bear witness to the conversation between fathers with fins.
    Mister Seahorse by Eric Carle. Copyright ©2004 by Eric Carle.
  • The Tiny Seed 16 of 23
    The Tiny Seed
    Poetic but simple text and lovely collage pictures dramatize the life cycle of all plants, as one tiny seed grows into an enormous sunflower, which then produces more seeds in its turn.
    The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1970 by Eric Carle.
  • “Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,” said the Sloth 17 of 23
    "Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," said the Sloth
    Slowly, slowly, slowly... that's how the sloth lives. He hangs upside-down from the branch of a tree, night and day, in the sun and in the rain, while the other animals of the rain forest rush past him. "Why are you so slow? Why are you so quiet? Why are you so lazy?" the others ask the sloth. And, after a long, long time, the sloth finally tells them!
    "Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," said the Sloth by Eric Carle. Copyright ©2002 by Eric Carle.
  • Draw Me a Star 18 of 23
    Draw Me a Star
    The artist's drawing of a star begins the creation of an entire universe around him as each successive pictured object requests that he draw more. Based on Eric Carle's recollection of his grandmother's way of drawing a star (directions included), this seemingly simple story also provides insights into an artist's private world of creativity. An inspiring book.
    Draw Me a Star by Eric Carle. Copyright © 1992 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar 19 of 23
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar
    Gorgeously illustrated, brilliantly innovative...
    -The New York Times Book Review
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1969 and 1987 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar 20 of 23
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar
    My aim with my work is to simplify and refine, be logical and harmonious. I like to use simple shapes, bright colors and a lot of white space. I write for the child inside of me. That is always where I begin.
    - Eric Carle
    The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1969 and 1987 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Lonely Firefly 21 of 23
    The Very Lonely Firefly
    Young readers empathize with the lonely firefly who makes many errors as he looks for the group where he will really "belong." In his search for compatible companions, he meets many other night creatures, but none is quite right—until the happy surprise at the very end when the illustration of a swarm of friendly fireflies literally shines and twinkles a welcome in the night. Heartwarming.
    The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1995 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Lonely Firefly 22 of 23
    The Very Lonely Firefly
    "With characteristic simplicity, Carle delivers another heartwarming tale about a diminutive creature on a quest. In the author/artist's words, [the] story is about belonging.'"
    - Publishers Weekly, June 5, 1995
    The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1995 by Eric Carle.
  • The Very Lonely Firefly 23 of 23
    The Very Lonely Firefly
    Carle's richly hued, collage-like art and gentle text will be comfortingly familiar to his numerous young devotees.
    - Publishers Weekly, June 5, 1995
    The Very Lonely Firefly by Eric Carle. Copyright ©1995 by Eric Carle.

All images and descriptions used with permission from the Eric Carle Studio

For more on the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art’s 10th anniversary celebration events, go here

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