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Frustrated Tennis Pro Lobs Ball Toward Crying Baby [Video]

Father holding culprit.

Everyone knows that you’re to be quiet during the points of a tennis match. Well, everyone but a baby, that is. And when you think about it, you can’t really blame a baby for not knowing. I mean it’s not his fault. Babies can’t even really talk yet. Much less understand proper tennis-match etiquette.

Regardless, I hardly think David Ferrer was exercising great etiquette himself, when during his match with Mardy Fish, he lobbed a ball in the general direction of a crying baby. Apparently Ferrer couldn’t contain his frustration caused by the mid-point ruckus brought on by the noisy, innocent one. Or at least that’s what I gathered when, after the point, Ferrer launched a ball into the stands toward the infant.

Video after the break.

Understandably, Ferrer’s action drew a chorus of boos from the crowd despite the fact that the ball was hit rather softly and came nowhere near the baby. Perhaps in accordance with karma, Ferrer went on to lose the match in straight sets.

For what it’s worth, he didn’t blame his subpar play on the toddler, but rather on a case of indigestion.

So, two things here… Number one — there are certain places I wouldn’t bring a baby. Libraries come to mind. As do golf tournaments. And tennis matches. Because babies will cry. And loud noises simply aren’t kosher at such events. But number two — Ferrer would have been better served to politely ask the father to leave the grandstand instead of lobbing a ball in disgust at a crying baby.

Good thing he doesn’t live at my house. He’d be lobbing balls all over the place.

What do you think? Would you take a baby to a tennis match?

The video appears below.

Image: YouTube
Source: CBS News

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