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Getting Wrinkles? Blame Your Mom.

Smiling daughter with her motherLately, I’ve been noticing some fine lines around my eyes that get far worse when I laugh or smile — this is just very visible proof that I’m getting older. But so far, I think I’ve been doing the whole getting old thing pretty gracefully. Most believe that I look far younger than my age (and no, I’m not going to tell you how old I am, so stop asking). And while I like to credit my youngish looks to staying out of the sun, not being a smoker, and drinking lots of water, it appears that I have something, or rather, someone else to thank: my mother.

According to an article by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Aging in the journal Nature, the genes we inherit from our mothers play a big part in how we age.

In their research, they discovered an important aspect of aging. Science Daily notes that “aging…seems to be the changes that occur in the cell’s power plant — the mitochondrion. This structure is located in the cell and generates most of the cell’s supply of ATP which is used as a source of chemical energy.”

“Surprisingly, we also show that our mother’s mitochondrial DNA seems to influence our own aging,” said Nils-Göran Larsson, Ph.D. “If we inherit mDNA with mutations from our mother, we age more quickly.”

This is the first time that researchers have been able to prove that a mother’s genes affect how one ages. But as of now, they don’t know how damaged DNA can be avoided through “lifestyle intervention.”

Although there is now scientific proof that how you age is effected by your mother, this is something that most anyone could notice just by looking at an adult woman and her mother (minus lifestyle choices that may have contributed to the aging process). Do you notice that you are aging like your own mother?

Photo Source: iStockphoto

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