Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Good Grief! Helicopter Parents Touch Down on the Soccer Field

Football

What's next? Telling kids they've aced a test when they've actually earned a D?

I can’t pinpoint exactly what kind of parenting style I embrace. I am overprotective in some ways (I freaked out at a birthday party in the world’s safest neighborhood on Sunday when my older daughter disappeared from my sight for approximately 45 seconds). In other ways, I couldn’t be more lax (want to wander around our backyard despite the fact that it’s bear season? Go for it!).

But I can tell you the kind of parent I am definitely not: The type that would let my kid participate in a soccer league that lies about the final score.

A junior soccer league in England has ceased releasing the true results of its matches, so as to minimize embarrassment for the losing team, according to the BBC.

I’ve seen and can understand kids’ sporting leagues that end games when the score gets too lopsided (you know, when one team is annihilating the other). But to falsely post final scores as 1-0, 0-1 or 0-0? What are the children learning here, besides lying is apparently OK?

The Telford Junior Football League is made up of 20 divisions of kids under the age of 16. Apparently league officials believe the young losers will potentially be humiliated by, well, losing, so the policy is meant to protect them.

What ever happened to needing to learn how to lose? Learning how to lose graciously? Learning how to win graciously? Learning how to try harder so you can avoid future humiliating losses? Do we really need to be that protective of our kids? How did kids ever survive before we started meddling with their final soccer scores? Sheesh.

Do you think this league is onto something smart, or is their whole final score notion absurd?

Image: Wikipedia

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest