UPDATE! Hana's Mom is Coming Home! North Korea Pardons US Journalists – WITH VIDEO

euna_6Mommy is coming home!  According to the Associated Press, Euna Lee and Laura Ling will be pardoned by Kim Jong Il and will be able to return to the United States. The two journalists who were on assignment for Current TV -  have been held captive in North Korea since March.  The two were sentenced in June to 12 years of hard labor.  A terrible fate for anyone, but especially for Euna Lee’s four-year-old daughter Hana.

It was reported that Hana, who was with her dad, would break down crying at least once a day not understanding why her mom hadn’t come back from her business trip.

If Euna had to fulfill the entire sentence, that would mean she wouldn’t have her mom back until she was sixteen. But Bill Clinton’s journey to meet with Kim Jong Il and arrange freedom for the two has been a success and the North Korean leader has pardoned the two who will be released soon.

Euna’s daughter Hana has most certainly been on the forefront of her mind.  Through a visit from a member of the Swedish consultant, Euna sent word to make sure her husband sent in her daughter summer school application. Yes, moms worry about that stuff no matter where they are.

The families have released the following statement:

The families of Laura Ling and Euna Lee are overjoyed by the news of their pardon. We are so grateful to our government: President Obama, Secretary Clinton and the U.S. State Department for their dedication to and hard work on behalf of American citizens.

We especially want to thank President Bill Clinton for taking on such an arduous mission and Vice President Al Gore for his tireless efforts to bring Laura and Euna home. We must also thank all the people who have supported our families through this ordeal, it has meant the world to us. We are counting the seconds to hold Laura and Euna in our arms.

UPDATE! The two were able to leave immediately with Bill Clinton and are being flown to Los Angeles. Here is video of them leaving North Korea

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