Categories

Healthy Pregnancy Wrongly Diagnosed As Miscarriage

How much can we trust our ultrasounds?

An expectant mom has just been through a roller coaster of an early pregnancy.

After suffering some spotting early on in her pregnancy, Chelsea Muff went in for an ultrasound and was told the worst had happened: she’d had a miscarriage.

Doctors wanted to prescribe pills to induce a medical abortion, to clear her uterus of the remaining tissue. She declined, more out of denial than anything else. Instead she opted for a surgical abortion. When she arrived two weeks later for the procedure, she asked the doctor to do one more ultrasound just to be sure.

This time, they found the baby’s heart beat.

That is about as terrifying a mistake as a doctor could ever make. They very nearly ended this woman’s healthy pregnancy because of a screw-up on her ultrasound.

Muff shared her story with the Telegraph:

She said: “The member of staff was shocked but really pleased for me. She said ‘you have a live baby’. I didn’t believe it. I had been so upset and couldn’t believe this could have happened.

“I was really happy at that point. It was only later, after discussing it with my partner, who was really mad about what I had been put through, that I realised I could have killed my baby by taking the tablet.”

I’m sure this kind of mistake is extremely rare. One can hope this is the only time it has ever happened. Yet hearing this woman’s story is making me viscerally glad I opted not to have an ultrasound after some early bleeding in my first pregnancy. My doctor at the time said that I’d either miscarry or not, and an ultrasound wouldn’t change that. I opted to spend a few days resting at home and sure enough, the bleeding stopped and I had a healthy baby 8 months later.

I hope Chelsea Muff is blessed with an uneventful pregnancy, easy labor and a healthy kid after what she’s been through.

Photo: redjar

Suffering in silence — how one mom coped with her miscarriage

Tagged as: , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.