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Honors Student Dishonorably Thrown in Jail for Missing School

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Was justice really served in the case of Diane Tran?

Kids skip school for plenty of reasons, and usually the reasons are not especially wholesome.

Diane Tran, 17, has missed a lot of school, but not for the same reasons that most other truants miss school. She juggles two jobs (one full-time and one part-time) while also taking college-level classes and caring for her siblings since her parents split up and left town, according to the New York Daily News. Sometimes she’s just too tired to get to school on time.

You’d think anyone and everyone at Willis High School in Willis, Texas, and in the surrounding community would be at least a little sympathetic to her situation and appreciative of the fact that despite everything she’s up against, she still manages to maintain a spot on the honor roll.

Except instead of trying to help Diane, she was thrown in jail for a night because of her excessive absences.

A judge named Lanny Moriarty apparently warned Diane last month to cease missing school lest she risk violating the truancy law.

“If you let one run loose, what are you gonna do with the rest of ‘em? Let them go too?” Judge Moriarty said to KHOU 11 News.

Diane missed another class and was sentenced to 24 hours in prison. Judge Moriarty is upfront about the fact that he’s using Diane as an example. No more than 10 unexcused absences are permitted in Texas, and no more than three in one month.

Hopefully everyone else besides the judge is outraged by her sentence and pulling together to see how they can help her and her siblings, so she can act her age and finish school without worrying about such adult things as jobs, caring for her family, and getting thrown in jail.

And hopefully Moriarty feels the wrath of what he’s done to the poor girl by being unseated the next time it comes to getting elected or appointed. Then maybe he can get a taste of what it feels like to have to juggle so much just to get by, nevermind get ahead.

Photo credit: iStock

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