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How Small Blogs/Bloggers Play A Big Role in Influence

It's good to be small.

It can be easy particularly in blog conference season when it seems like everyone else is speaking, going to the cool parties, and being invited on the special trips to feel like a small blogger lost in a sea of other, bigger blogs.

But when I do blogger outreach and speak to clients about the best bloggers to work with, I often advocate the smaller bloggers. Not only do they (often) give more to a project than bigger bloggers, but I’ve seen the ROI first hand; smaller blogger nearly ALWAYS deliver more conversions than big bloggers do.

One of the reasons this might be true is highlighted in this great article about understanding influence and “conversation maturity.”

This infographic from the article highlights the way conversations flow on line. What I take away from this infographic is the fact that maybe a big blogger STARTS the conversation, it’s the smaller bloggers that become the amplifiers, curators, and commentators of that discussion. Why does that matter? Well, as you can see by the graph above, just having the big bloggers say something only causes a momentary spike of interest and discussion. It’s when the rest of the world picks up the story i.e., the small bloggers that the conversation stays topical and ends up becoming not just talk, but actually conversions (meaning sales).

The article puts it this way (emphasis mine):

The idea starter and the amplifier however, what I have only recently realised in my own Eureka moment, is that a forgotten but critical player is the curator needs to be engaged with. This person, often overlooked due to their relatively low popularity has proven to be a significant driver of influence. When analysing the three types below, it is clear to see that as marketers we must adopt both technology tools and sociological profiling to help us interact with people.

If you’re a smaller blogger, you can rest easier knowing that you’re actually a big part of the marketing solution. I’d definitely add the Social Media Today article to your arsenal of knowledge.

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