Categories

Huge Win! Transgendered First-Grader Wins Right To Use Girls’ Restroom

Coy Mathis

Coy Mathis

Back in February I introduced you to Coy Mathis. She’s was born with male sex organs but completely identifies as female. Coy dresses as a girl and her passport recognizes her as female. Nonetheless, in December the Fountain-Fort Carson School District district in Colorado told Coy’s parents she can’t use the girls’ room anymore.

This week, a huge victory for Coy and all other transgendered children: after a months-long battle, Coy has won the right to use the girls’ bathroom. As CNN reports, Coy’s parents took her case had taken her case to The Colorado Rights Division.  In issuing its decision, a first of it’s kind regarding rights for transgendered students, the division said keeping the ban in place “creates an environment that is objectively and subjectively hostile, intimidating or offensive.”

Basically, transgendered students must be treated equally!

The Colorado Rights Division specifically referenced the aged concept of separate but equal and said separate but equal is very rarely equal and it is certainly not equal in Coy’s case.

Coy’s mother tells CNN she’s just happy Coy can go back to school (she’s been home-schooled while the case was pending) and is happy to put the whole ordeal behind them. “We’re very thrilled that Coy is able to return to school and have the same rights that all the other girls had, that she should have had and was afforded by law to begin with. We’re extremely happy that she’s going to be treated equally and we thank the civil rights division for coming to this conclusion.”

I’m so happy to hear about this landmark ruling. Separate, by it’s very nature of being separate, can never be equal. Did we learn nothing from the Civil Rights Movement? What about you? Do you agree with the ruling issued by The Colorado Rights Division?

Image source: Transgender Legal Defense and Education Fund

Read more from Monica on Babble:

Tagged as: ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.