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Injuries From Cleaning Products Down in US

Good news!  Researchers have found that in the last 17 years, poisonings and chemical burns from household cleaning products have decreased by 46 percent, according to CBC News.  The study, led by Lara McKenzie of the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is published in the August issue of Pediatrics.

Unlabeled bleach accounts for the largest amount of injuries from cleaning products, due to the fact that it can so often be found outside of its original packaging, “in pots and pans, among other things.”  Children ages 1-3 are the most susceptible to accidental poisoning and burns, so if you’ve got a toddler in your midst, be sure to adhere to the following rules when storing cleaning products:

  • Lock harmful cleaners and chemicals up and/or store them out of reach of children.
  • Buy products with child-resistant packaging.
  • Keep products in their original containers.
  • Properly dispose of leftover or unused products.

You might also consider using more common non-toxic items like white vingear for everyday, light cleaning jobs such as wiping counters.  Check out these tips about how to use white vinegar around your home.

As we all know, accidents happen when we least expect them.  When my daughter was just over a year old, she was sitting next to me, playing silently – or so I thought.  Instead, unbeknownst to me, she’d chewed the heads off an entire pack of matches.  Naturally, I called the Poison Control Center in a panic, but the woman on the phone reassured me that all I needed to do was give her a glass of milk and she’d be fine.  In case your toddler gets curious, be sure to have their number handy: 1-800-222-1222.

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