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Injuries to Children from Falling TVs On The Rise

tvEvery 45 minutes a child is rushed to an emergency room in the United States with an injury related to a falling television.

As Yahoo reports, the frequency of these types of injuries may be increasing but it’s hard to tell because the style and average number of TVs in U.S. homes has been changing in recent years.

The study caught my eye because, until now, I have felt safer with our flat screen TVs as they are nowhere near the monsters that old-school TVs used to be. Nonetheless,  you should always mount your flat screen to the wall, something that a lot of people aren’t doing.

Dr. Gary Smith, the study’s senior author and president of the Child Injury Prevention Alliance says that injuries from falling TVs are on the rise while injuries related to running into or striking TVs is dropping.

More than half of the injuries were caused by falling TVs, another 38 percent were caused by children running into the units and about 9 percent were caused by other situations, including televisions being moved from one location to another…The rate of injuries caused by falling TVs doubled from about 1 per 10,000 children in 1990 to about 2 per 10,000 children in 2011.

Makes perfect sense to me. Remember those million pound numbers that sat on the floor and doubled as furniture that held nick-nacks? Of course you’d be injured if you ran into one of those bad boys, but they aren’t around much anymore. Still, flat screen televisions can be just as dangerous as the older, larger televisions we grew up with. It’s a good reminder for me as I’m usually  more concerned with my toddler mucking up the screen with dirty fingers and banging it up with toys as opposed to him being injured.

What about you? Is your TV secured to the wall?

You can read the entire study here.

Image source: awn.com

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