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Is Gavin McInnes’ “How to Fight a Baby” Viral Hit Cool or Cruel? (Video)

GavinThe title of the video alone will make people cringe and New York-based writer Gavin McInnes’ clip entitled “How to Fight a Baby,” is doing just that. And while some might have  a hissy-fit over Gavin wresting the youngest of his three children, others take no issue with his roughhousing.

In the short YouTube clip, which has gotten about 800,000 hits in just one day, Gavin (of Vice Magazine fame) engages in some good old-fashioned roughhousing with his 10-month-old diaper donning son. The dad begins by addressing those who are watching that are “scared of babies,” informing them that, “there are a lot of different moves you can do to kick a baby’s ass.” He then demonstrates a variety of moves that look like they were torn from the page book of Lucha Libre.

But the baby does not get hurt during the daddy/son hi-jinx, in fact his child seems to be enjoying every minute of. But Gavin does not emerge unscathed. He suffers an eye injury, apparently his baby has some fierce moves. Still, even though the baby is totally fine, people have been voicing their opinions about Gavin’s parenting.

“I mean, I would hate if child services took my children away, but outside of that, I’m not concerned if it makes people mad or not,” he told TODAY.com.

Roughhousing isn’t just a standard part of play but can actually be beneficial. Our own Heather Turgeon wrote that roughhousing can “actually promote social competence and emotional regulation. It could be seen as a way to practice physical and mental skills, but also to make contact and build relationships.”

TODAY.com brought up new studies that promote roughhousing and Gavin agreed added that, “I think the safety pendulum has swung too far,” he said.

Check out the video below. Do you think he took it took far?

Photo Source: Gavin McInnes/ YouTube via Today

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