Issues! Parenting Helps You Kick the Kid Out

parentingcoverjuneMy husband and I shared the bed with all three of our babies. We were fine with it and it worked out just fine, especially during the newborn stage.

But we’ve already kicked our son out — he’s six months old — because after two already, I knew that getting them out when they’re older is hard, just hard.

The June issue of Parenting: The Early Years magazine devised a whole system to help parents reclaim their bed. It’s loaded with ideas that sound great. Yet I know from experience they don’t always work.

Here’s their plan in a nutshell:

Establish a consistent bedtime routine (soooooo tired of this advice, though it’s probably good).

Don’t start the kicking out  process if you’re in the middle of big changes (divorce, potty training, etc.)

Start talking about the coming changes first.

Park’em in (their) bed and let them cry it out — OR!

Camp out on the kid’s room …. on the floor. (You’ll do this many, many nights). After a few nights, switch to a chair (no talking!) until the child falls asleep. Then go to your bed. Each night, move the chair closer and closer to the door. Then finally, outside the room.

If all else fails, erect a baby gate. Or buy them off with presents.

Those final two would have sent my daughters over the edge and never worked, respectively.

This camping/chair moving stuff seems soul-sapping. But so is sleeping in bed with your kid when you’re ready for it to be over.

Also in the June issue: “How to Take Your Baby (Almost) Anywhere.” Now this one I totally know — you just take them, anywhere. See? Easy!

What did you do to reclaim your bed? Or are you sticking it out? Or maybe you’re still enjoying co-sleeping with your preschooler?

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Photo: Parenting.com

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