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It's Your Age, Not Your Clothes' Size

wearyoursizeWhen I need a laugh, I can usually depend on Passive Aggressive Notes, and this gem is no different.

A dad replaced the labels on his daughter’s pants with “none of your damn business,” to keep a babysitter from repeating that the tot should be wearing “her age” in clothing.

As in, if she’s two years old, she should be wearing a size 2T, at three her little shorts should read 3T and so on. The father’s actions cracked me up, but the babysitter’s just left me mystified.

How many kids do you know who actually “wear their age?” Maybe for a month or two, or maybe one particular piece of clothing on the body but not all. But most kids I know wear a conglomeration of sizes.

Take my own daughter, for example. Her super long torso (thanks Opa) means her shirts may be as much as two sizes above her age at any given moment, although her skinny little arms look like they’re swimming in a tent. Her tiny waist, on the other hand, means we’re either a size BELOW her age or fastening the age-to-size waistbands super-tight (thank goodness for those adjustable bands). Two-piece sets are the bane of my existence as they can NEVER be worn as an actual set (the tops need to be thrown on immediately, the pants will remain in the closet for a good year or so).

And don’t even get me started on shoes. I went out and picked up a set of sandals for summer, and my parents bought her an even larger size figuring she’d need them by summer’s end. . . only to find out that her feet haven’t grown since last year. She’s still wearing the Crocs she wore last August.

With the variety of sizes of kids, it stands to reason that the sizes on the rack are an average more so than a guide. Basically, every kid in America gets to experience what we women have for years – ignore the label. Just put it on and see if it fits.

Do your kids actually “wear their age” or are you in the same boat?

Image/Source: Passive Aggressive Notes

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