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Kids Comics This Week – Is This For Kids Or Not?

Hey Kids! Comics!Sometimes a comic comes out and it’s not clear whether or not it’s for kids. Some series, like The Boys, are clearly meant for adults. (Somewhat immature adults, but adults.) You can tell it’s not for kids because of the nudity and the explicit sex, and there’s a Parental Advisory on the cover. Sometimes, though, it’s hard to tell.

There was a time when comics were published and no one really thought about whether or not they were appropriate for a particular age group. Then Marvel started Marvel Age, which eventually became Marvel Adventures, which is their young readers line. It’s basically Spider-Man and the rest of the characters, but without excessive violence or continuity issues. (Although the regular Spider-Man series doesn’t seem to care about continuity either after the debacle of Brand New Day, where Peter Parker’s marriage to Mary Jane Watson was eliminated after Peter made a deal with the devil to save Aunt May’s life. Long story.) Some books are graded on the front – A for “all ages”, T+ for teenagers, and Parental Advisory for Stuff You Shouldn’t Show Your Kids. But the current Iron Man series is rated A, and the plot involves Tony Stark deleting his brain and killing himself, slowly, so that Norman Osborne doesn’t get access to all of the Marvel heroes’ secret identities. (Again, long story.) Does that sound like a story for an eight-year-old?

Anyway, here are this week’s comics, including some that I’m not sure if they’re for kids or adults.

Ghostbusters Displaced Aggression #1: This is one example. No idea if this is meant for kids or not. With the new Ghostbuster movie in the work, there will probably be a lot of comics. My kids saw the movie and liked it, so I may need to pick these up at some point.

MODOK Reign Delay: M.O.D.O.K. stands for Mental Organism Designed Only for Killing. He was a scientist that became an enormous head that wears armor, with little tiny arms and legs sticking out. (Read more about him here.) My son and I like to make fun of the acronym — Mental Organism Designed Only for Eating (M.O.D.O.E.), Mental Organism Designed Only for Dancing (M.O.D.O.D.), and so on. Play at home, it’s fun. I think he was supposed to be creepy but he looks so ridiculous that it’s hard to take him seriously, even in the context of comic books, where readers will put up with a lot. This comic is rated T+. Why? What could possibly be in here that would be inappopriate for young readers? Full front supervillian nudity? MODOK gets it on with Madame Masque? So I bought it, and I’ll read it first to make sure it’s OK for my kid to read. I know. It’s a tough job but somebody has to do it.

Hercules Prince Of Power HC Premiere Edition: Reprint of a great mini-series I read as a kid. I remember it being fine for younger eyes, although it was a long time ago (early 80’s) so who knows. Read more about it at WizardUniverse.

Athena #1 With Obama Flipbook: More Baracksploitation. They’ll keep putting the Prez in comics until people stop buying them.

Archie #601 – the wedding issue: Archie and Veronica! Married! Oh noes! But this is part 2 of 6, so who knows what will actually happen.

Betty & Veronica Double Digest #174

Jughead And Friends Digest #34

Scooby Doo Vol 6 #148

Tiny Titans #20: Raven’s dad Trigon is a substitute teacher. He’s late so she opens a black hole to teleport him to his classroom. I love this comic.

Uncanny X-Men First Class #3

Grown-up title of the week:

The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines: Mainstream comic books are very sexist. This is not a comic book, but a paperback that asks the question, “Has Wonder Woman hit the comic book glass ceiling? Is that the one opposition that even her Amazonian strength can’t defeat?” OK. Pick up it here.

Toy of the week:

Wonder Woman Mini Neon Sign: Every kid should have neon in their window, and a beer sign would be tacky.

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