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Kids Don't Want to Be on Facebook With Grandma

By jeannesager |

facebookhave1New surveys say teenagers are decamping from social media in droves. And to that, I say, come on, how long did you really expect them to stick around? They’re getting friend requests from their grandmothers!

The Guardian cited research by a media regulator in an analysis that the percentage of fifteen- to twenty-four-year-olds with a page on a social networking site has dropped for the first time this year (not much, however, from fifty-five to fifty percent).  Meanwhile, the twenty-five and above group is growing.

Considering the kerfuffle earlier this year about kids who don’t want to be friend by their mothers, this shouldn’t be much of a surprise. Not to mention the grief even those of us in the over twenty-five group are getting from older folks over our decisions to simply be ourselves (and use the f-word) on Facebook. Family drama has moved from the dinner table to the internet – and teens are doing what teens do best . . . shoving their earbuds in their ears and walking away.

Does that mean parents are doing a good job? Not in driving their kids from the table but in forcing them to re-evaluate some of what they’re putting out to the world?

Because one can’t help but filter themselves when Mom and Dad show up on the scene. Trust me – I have found this out just recently. I accepted my mother’s friend request. My brother, as far as I know, has left it in the perpetual “ignore” category (give him credit – he still lives at home). Already, I’ve found myself wondering “should I say this?”

Unlike the teens on Facebook or Myspace who are sharing in a potentially dangerous way (hello nekkid pictures and incriminating details of their teen pranks), my shares are more frustration based . . . often about family matters. And so I ask myself, “do I want the drama?”

With teens, on the other hand, the knowledge that Gran is looking over your shoulder should keep the pictures of you drinking with your buddies off of Facebook . . . which begets the question “why am I doing something that I’m ashamed of.”

Yes, parents, grandparents . . . you’re doing your job. Now I’m off to share this post on Facebook. Anyone know how to block my mother from seeing it? It’s not drama . . . but does she really need the big head?

Image: Facebook

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About jeannesager

jeannesager

jeannesager

Jeanne Sager is a freelance writer and photographer living in upstate New York with her husband and daughter, Jillian. She maintains a blog of her award-winning columns at jeannesager.blogspot.com.

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3 thoughts on “Kids Don't Want to Be on Facebook With Grandma

  1. Jay says:

    Hah, this is one of the reasons I just deleted my facebook account… having my mother scold me for things my friends posted on my page, even though I’m 20, and knowing my grandmother and aunts would see the same things… It was too much hassle to deal with

  2. amy says:

    same reason i deleted mine a few weeks ago.
    overly zealous fundamentalist sister-in-law started telling my husband that she felt sorry for him (because of me).

    bleh.

  3. HA says:

    HA! Time to find a new outlet in which to share our ‘nekkid’ pictures and illegal tasteless pranks. Good job parents!

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