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Kids Write Christmas Letters to Christ

p3153971_cropIt is a tradition carried out by children everywhere — the letter to Santa.  Children list the toys they want to receive as Christmas gifts, address it to Santa, and drop it in the mail box in hopes that Saint Nick will bring them exactly what they want most.  You can even see thousands of these letters playing the part of the deus ex machina in the classic film, Miracle on 34th Street, where they save Santa Claus and Christmas.  But are such letters really in the best spirit of the season?  Not everyone thinks so.


The fifth-grade students at St. Monica School in Kalamazoo, Michigan skipped the letters to the jolly old elf and instead wrote their missives to the baby Jesus.  The kids didn’t ask for toys or gifts but rather wrote about how they celebrated the birth of Christ and what it meant to them.  While I don’t personally believe in either Santa Claus or Jesus Christ, I have to say that if you do subscribe to the biblical version of the Christmas story (and, after all, why else would you put your kids in a Catholic school?), these kids’ letters seem much more in line with what the season means to them than the more commercial letters begging for presents.

Whatever your beliefs might be, I think we can all agree that, for some people at least, the holiday season has become far too much about receiving and nowhere near enough about giving.  So while I may not agree with the alternative these kids chose, perhaps they’re on the right track by not asking Santa for more stuff.

Photo: mconnors

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