Previous Post Next Post

Mom

Brought to you by

30+ Lessons on Life and Love We Learned from Our Dads

A Babble tribute to Father's Day

By Babble |

Slideshow Loading
  • Lessons from My Dad

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Get out of the car

    Lessons from My Dad: Get out of the car

    My family went on all sorts of outdoor trips when I was a kid in California — Yosemite, Big Sur, Yellowstone, Lake Tahoe and more. Sometimes, after those long car rides, all I’d want to do was stay in the car once we’d arrived at our destination. Another hike? More wildflower fields? But my dad always inspired me to "get out of the car" to discover where the path would take me. This lesson has stuck with me — even when you are tired, just go. - Kathy Patalsky, Family Kitchen blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Fly without fear

    Lessons from My Dad: Fly without fear

    My dad taught me how to fly a plane when I was 5 years old. While it's easy to question the sanity of this (and my mom did, often), there was something genuinely awesome about how real the danger was and how much confidence he had in my ability to get us across the mesas and arroyos of New Mexico. Being treated like I could handle the pressure showed me that I could, in fact, handle it. Side bonus: Learning how to navigate before I could see out the window turned out to be great prep for the whole "flying blind" part of life. - Mira Jacob, Deputy Editor

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Give of yourself

    Lessons from My Dad: Give of yourself

    My dad always manages to find time to help others and in doing so has taught me, or rather shown me, what selflessness truly means. Most recently he taught me that there's a better alternative to 401Ks — I can't remember what it's called or why it's better, but I know that if I call him, he will explain it (for like the millionth time) with the utmost patience. - Eric Peterson, Assistant Designer

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Question authority

    Lessons from My Dad: Question authority

    When I was about 6, we passed a hill full of grazing cows, and my dad pointed at them, saying, "Ya see those cows, kid? Those are hill cows. They got two legs shorter on one side so they can balance." My Dad knew a lot about farm life, so I took him at his word. Six years later it dawned on me: What would happen if they turned around? “Their legs can’t be shorter on one side!” I told him. My dad let out his signature laugh and shouted, "You finally figured it out." He taught me how to think for myself and helped me develop my own sense of humor. I wish he was still here so I could pull his finger and wish him a Happy Farter's Day. - Carolyn Castiglia, Strollerderby blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Just go for it, whatever it is

    Lessons from My Dad: Just go for it, whatever it is

    Don't be afraid to try — it's a simple lesson, but one that my dad started teaching me when I was very young. He applied it to everything, like allowing me to give him a haircut even though the only experience I had was getting my own hair cut by someone else. I think the reason he trusted a 10-year-old with a pair of scissors near his face was because he knew I was a perfectionist. Now I've changed career paths and moved across the country twice. I'd like to think my dad was behind those decisions. He allowed me to see that all I have to do is try, because I won't let myself fail. - Raydene Salinas, Photo Editor

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Laugh it off

    Lessons from My Dad: Laugh it off

    The most important thing I’ve learned from my dad is to use humor to lighten those tough moments in life. The day before I started high school, I was extremely nervous so he said to me, “Megan, just go in there, take a look around the room and say loudly, ‘Yeah, I was the cutest girl at my last school, too.’” I didn’t actually do this, but it was funny advice that made me laugh and feel less scared about the next day. - Megan Segura, Editorial Intern

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Allow yourself to float

    Lessons from My Dad: Allow yourself to float

    One of the most important things I still remember is my dad teaching me how to float on my back in the ocean. He taught me how to let go of my fears, relax, and just go with the flow, even if it’s just for a few minutes. To this day I’m most at peace while floating on my back in a calm surf — I'm completely weightless, as if nothing else matters. It’s in these moments when I also feel a special closeness to my father, even though he passed so long ago. - Angie McGowan, Family Kitchen blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Save your best puns for teenagers

    Lessons from My Dad: Save your best puns for teenagers

    One of my favorite things I've learned from my dad is the art of a well-placed pun. He taught me that no matter the situation, there's always room for a joke — the cornier, the better. In my teenage, pre-coffee days (a dark, dark time, I might add), he'd greet my refusal to get out of bed with, "Morning has broken — we need to go fix it!" As far as comedy goes, grumpy adolescents aren't exactly an ideal crowd, but he never stopped trying to get us to laugh (or at least crack a smile). If that isn't love, I don't know what is. - Amy Soukup, Editorial Intern

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Talk to strangers

    Lessons from My Dad: Talk to strangers I've watched my dad make countless connections through casual, friendly chitchat throughout his life. As a teen I would cringe as he struck up conversations with complete strangers — something I was too shy to do. However, I saw time and time again how just a 5-minute talk could turn into new and valuable knowledge, an entertaining invitation, or even a lifelong friendship. Now the thought of speaking with *gasp* complete strangers gives me a thrill (perhaps out of necessity, living in New York and all). And I no longer cringe when my dad talks to people we don’t know. Instead, I chuckle and wonder where that exchange will lead him.

    - Mandalee Meisner, Senior Designer

  • Lessons from My Dad

    There is no secret to success

    Lessons from My Dad: There is no secret to success

    When I was 18, I asked my dad, a very successful entrepreneur, "What’s the secret to success?" His answer was far simpler than I expected. "There is no secret," he said. "Success is equal parts hard work and accountability." Now that I’m an adult, I understand how he truly embodied this ideology. He was always a blood, sweat, and tears sort of man who could always be counted on. There are no secret paths or easy roads to success, but hard work and accountability are helping me become the woman I want to be. - Melissa Embrey Jordan, Baby's First Year blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Pursue your passion

    Lessons from My Dad: Pursue your passion

    When I was 20, my dad and I took an unforgettable trip to Phoenix. At the time, I was a huge Fleetwood Mac fan and I wanted to know why Stevie Nicks chose to live in Arizona. So before we went, I did an extensive Google search and found her address. On the last day of the trip, we rented a car to find my Mecca. I assumed we’d be able to drive by her home like a Hollywood bus tour, but it turned out she lived in a gated community. Instead of turning around, my dad tried to convince the guard we had an appointment to see a house in the neighborhood (hers). We didn’t make it in, but it didn’t matter. My dad taught me that persistence has its own rewards. - Dara Pettinelli, Lifestyle Editor

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Have a little faith

    Lessons from My Dad: Have a little faith

    My dad would get mad at me any time I said the word “can't.” Which I did — a lot — when I was younger. "Stop saying you can't," he'd say. "I don't like that word." Eventually it sank in. So, I guess my dad taught me to have a little more faith in myself — and to stop being so whiny. - Andrea Roxas, Assistant Editor

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Appreciate each day

    Lessons from My Dad: Appreciate each day

    My father was 26 when he was killed. Adventurous and charming, he had his whole life in front of him. Until one day, he didn’t. I was two when he died and I have no memories of him. I was robbed of his presence in my life, but he taught me lessons nonetheless. Because of my father, I shower my husband and children with love and whisper, “I love you,” every chance I get. His brief life taught me to live each day fully, to strive to see the beauty in each moment, and to never wish a second away. - Nichole Beaudry, Being Pregnant blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Be rich in love

    Lessons from My Dad: Be rich in love

    My father has shown me the importance of family. We may not have had the most money or the best of everything, but my dad’s job (albeit not glamorous), allowed him and my mom to be there for my brother and me as we were growing up — including each and every one of my cheerleading competitions and dance recitals — and that has meant everything to me. I’m my daddy’s little girl, and he’s my number-one fan, and his active presence in my life exemplifies the parent I want to be one day. - Marisa DeSisto, Editorial Intern

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Break the cycle

    Lessons from My Dad: Break the cycle

    When I was little, the guy I called “dad” was at best gregarious and at worst, harsh. I was a teen when I discovered that he wasn’t even my real dad, which led me to years of rebellious, self-destructive behavior as I wondered who my real dad was and why he left. Thanks to my fiance, I am now loved by, and witness to, the type of father I had always dreamt about for myself and my future children. He has slowly taught me to trust again, to believe in family, and leave my fears in the past. Just the sight of my young lad and his dad together do the most schmaltzy, tender things to my tough soul. A good mix to possess, I think. - Selena Burgess, Being Pregnant blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Develop a good golf swing

    Lessons from My Dad: Develop a good golf swing

    My dad started teaching me to play golf as soon as I could hold a plastic club. I can remember him going over the fundamentals of the game while I was too young to consciously process what I was learning. By the time I got to high school, I was good enough to become captain of the JV team my freshman year. The skills I'd learned finally paid off when I beat my coach during the end-of-the-season tournament. Today, whenever I'm on the course and I see someone my age struggling to get the ball off the tee, I'm grateful my father took the time to set me straight at a young age. - Ryan Rogalski, Production Assistant

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Pee before you leave

    Lessons from My Dad: Pee before you leave

    Every summer my parents would pack up the station wagon, load us kids in, and head out for a road trip. Without fail, by the second hour, we’d cry that we needed to pee: "DAD, stop the car!" To which he responded, "Pee in a bottle!” Hours would pass until we would finally pull over — not because dad was giving in, but because he had to pee. Thanks, Dad, for helping us develop strong bladders. Now that I have a family, we love road trips. But my kids should be thankful because we pull over when nature calls. Molly Thornberg, Being Pregnant blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Failure is the best teacher

    Lessons from My Dad: Failure is the best teacher

    Whether it was learning how to ride a bike, shave, swim, or even talk to girls, my dad offered me little guidance while I was growing up. The day of my college graduation, he finally explained that he had wanted me to learn everything on my own, to be self-sufficient and diligent. "If you want something, nobody's going to get it for you,” he explained. “You need to experience pain and frustration to be a stronger man because I'm not always going to be around to help." So thank you, dad, for all the scrapes, bruises, cuts, and countless rejections from the opposite gender, and for believing that I would succeed in spite of it all. - Justin Han, Traffic and Operations Coordinator

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Enjoy the ride

    Lessons from My Dad: Enjoy the ride

    The most important thing that I learned from my dad was not to take myself too seriously. No matter what he and I are talking about or what we are doing, laughter is always involved. So many people spend so much time focused on trying to be perfect instead of just relaxing and enjoying the little moments that make life so special. He also taught me how to ignore the “what ifs” — "If ifs and buts were candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas,” he always says. What's the point of life if you can't have a little fun? - Mary Fischer, Famecrawler blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Take a stand

    Lessons from My Dad: Take a stand

    My father always taught me to stand up for what I believe in. I think deep down, he actually created the passion I have about so many topics and social issues. To this day, we maintain a very strong relationship, and every time I accomplish something new, he’s there, cheering me on. I am the woman I am today because of his influence. - Danielle Elwood, Baby’s First Year blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Laugh at yourself

    Lessons from My Dad: Laugh at yourself

    My dad taught me the importance of being goofy. He's never afraid to be silly or laugh at himself. (I recall being totally embarrassed to introduce him to boyfriends in high school, but today, I couldn't be more proud.) After all, it's that sense of humor that makes life a lot more fun! - Andrea Zimmerman, Blogs & Social Media Manager

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Wait for the right one

    Lessons from My Dad: Wait for the right one

    My stepdad taught me that the man I should marry is the one who does the chasing, and the ones I have to change myself for or throw myself at are the wrong guys. He reassured me that the right man would fight for me and love me for who I am. And he was right. I waited for that guy, and we are going on nine years of marriage! - Shell, Famecrawler blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Keep moving

    Lessons from My Dad: Keep moving

    My dad loved sports and the great outdoors; he would take us running almost every day. We would spend hours at the beach and days at the tennis courts. We were a very active family that hiked and biked together, and now I am doing the same with my family. Thanks, dad! - Rachel Faucett, Family Style blogger

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Make the world a nicer place

    Lessons from My Dad: Make the world a nicer place

    When I was a teenager, I would occasionally run family errands. I remember one day taking the car to get the oil changed. The mechanic said to me, "Tell your dad Mike said hi, would you?" When I would go to pick up the dry cleaning, the guy at the counter would say, "Please wish your dad my best." I remember thinking at the time, What on earth is my father saying to these people? It was easy enough to figure out — my father has always built warm relationships, through playful banter and genuine interest, with everyone he meets. His core insight, I think, is that most people are friendly and interesting, and you should make it a challenge to figure out how and why. The result is that his corner of the world is a little bit sunnier than most. It's hard to see this, growing up, and not want to be similar. - Rufus Griscom, CEO and Co-Publisher

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Throw like a boy

    Throw Like a Boy

    My father, I am told, wanted to have one boy. Instead he got three girls. He handled that curveball with incredible good-naturedness and poise. And furthermore, he channeled his dreams for a son into raising us as though we were boys. Through my many years spent working my way through classrooms, soccer fields, relationships and business opportunities, I’ve realized that in raising me as he would a boy, he taught me to be blind to the barriers that are sometimes put in front of women. Now if I could only get my husband to do the dishes, change more diapers and do the laundry! - Alisa Volkman, Co-Publisher & Vice President

  • Lessons from My Dad

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Never give up

    Never give up

    My Dad taught me not to quit when it gets tough, and that even if people say you can't do something, the only one who decides that is you! Love you Dad! - Angie Himes

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Drive carefully

    Drive carefully Slow down going into a curve and speed up coming out. Best advice ever!

    - Kim Varner

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Know that family comes first

    Know that family comes first My Dad taught me that family is number one because it is the one thing that cannot be replaced. Thanks Dad, I love you.

    - Jill Bernis

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Treat everyone with respect

    Treat everyone with respect

    My dad taught me how to love — not just family and friends but people with diseases and disabilities. He also taught me how to respect and treat everyone the same no matter what color they are. - Danielle Long

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Strike your own path

    Strike your own path My Pop has taught me so many POWS (pearls of wisdom). Most importantly, to make your OWN path in life, even if that means you have to trudge through weeds and stumble. Pop said if you believe in that path, follow it, and the next person won't have it so hard. Thanks Pop, for being an amazing role model and my best friend!

    - JoAnne Thomas

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Have compassion

    Have compassion My father, who grew up in Chinese military schools, whose parenting style went way beyond the “tiger-mother,” was a violent, sadistic, abusive rage-aholic. Watching him shatter and destroy all the potentially great things in his life was beyond distressing, but an invaluable lesson. He unintentionally taught me optimism, how to find inner strength, and also how to attract beauty, love and goodness in the world. I am thankful that he is my father and that I experienced these great mental, emotional and physical pains so that I can have compassion and understanding for those in similar situations.

    - Sensible Girlfriend

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Don’t worry about material things

    Don’t worry about material things My dad has taught me to never give up. I didn't have a great childhood growing up and my dad had to work really hard to provide everything we have. I now cherish everything I have with my husband and son, and I've learned life isn't about material things — it’s about enjoying what you have and the love you have for your family and friends.

    - Amber

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Connect with nature

    Connect with nature My Dad taught me how to fly fish and tie flies. Most importantly, he taught me that there aren't many problems that can't be fixed by spending a quiet morning casting a line over a cool stream.

    - Molly Norton

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Have faith

    Have faith As my husband was lying in a coma in the hospital and doctors told me he would not survive, my father held me in his arms and cried with me — and never left my side. My husband made a miraculous recovery and walked away with no side effects whatsoever. God taught me a lot during that ordeal. He taught me that even though I am a grown woman with a family of my own, I still need my daddy to hold me and comfort me. He was a rock for me to lean on, he was the voice of reason I needed, and most importantly, he was my prayer partner.

    - Bethany Gill

  • Lessons from My Dad

    You can do anything

    You can do anything I know that if it weren't for my father, I would have dropped out of high school. Instead, I went from being kicked out of one school to graduating with multiple scholarships from another. I have my own life and my own family now, and I believe with all of my heart that it was because of the strength my father gave me. Even now that I am nearly 30 and he is 85, I still rest my head on his frail shoulders when I can.

    - Tamara S. Arndt

  • Lessons from My Dad

    Bait and cast

    Bait and cast My dad taught me how to fish. I can bait a hook, cast perfectly, and clean my catch. I even taught my husband how to fish! Just a few weeks ago a group of friends were fishing with their sons. I took the pole from my 4-year-old son to cast the line and one of the men rushed over and said, "Let me get that for you." I smiled and cast the line out perfectly. It was great to see every man’s jaw drop.

    - Beckster

More on Babble

About Babble

bcbabble

Babble

Launched in December 2006, Babble has a National Magazine Award nomination for Best Overall Website (opposite Slate.com) and a Folio magazine award for Best Online Magazine (beating out everyone but Time.com). Time magazine named it one of the Top 50 websites of 2010. Babble was acquired by The Walt Disney Company in November, 2011.

« Go back to Mom

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Comments, together with personal information accompanying them, may be used on Babble.com and other Babble media platforms. Learn More.

110 thoughts on “30+ Lessons on Life and Love We Learned from Our Dads

  1. Anonymous says:

    Aw these are such great dad and me photos!

  2. Anonymous says:

    LOVE love LOVE the stories, Rufus and Alisa…..super touching. Thank you, Teryn

  3. Paula Bernstein Orkin says:

    My dad taught me that you’re never too old to learn something new. In his 40s, he taught himself how to sail and bought a sailboat, which he enjoyed for years. Then, at 70, he started riding horses. He loved it so much that he volunteered to teach in a therapeutic riding program for disabled kids and adults. Now at 75, he is still learning new things and testing his limits.

  4. Heather E says:

    My dad taught me the importance of silliness. He was never afraid to make fun of himself or dance a funny dance. He died of cancer six years ago and even as we were gathered around his bed in the hospital, people were sharing stories of all the times he made them laugh or funny things he did to cheer people up. Now that I have a two year old son I often look for ways to infuse his world with silliness because I know my dad would have been such a fun grandpa.

  5. Heather Eggum says:

    My dad taught me the importance of silliness. He was never afraid to make fun of himself or dance a funny dance. He died of cancer six years ago and even as we were gathered around his bed in the hospital, people were sharing stories of all the times he made them laugh or funny things he did to cheer people up. Now that I have a two year old son I often look for ways to infuse his world with silliness because I know my dad would have been such a fun grandpa.

  6. Angela Rodriguez says:

    My Dad has taught my siblings and I the importance of family. We come from a large mexican family. On my Dad’s side of the family there are 93 of us soon to be 94. We get together twice a year. With that being said he had instilled in us the importance of being there for each other even within our small individual family. We always show up to support each other. Aunts, uncles, cousins and all. Out of all mine, my brother and sisters extracurricular activities he and my mother only had to miss once and they made sure we had other family there to support us. I have always felt supported, never once felt like I didn’t have anyone. I am so proud of who my Dad is and who he has taught us to be. I love having such a close family and I love that other people notice it and make comments. A frequent question I get is “I love the relationship you have with your parents, how were they when you were growing up because I want that with my kids?” I also love that I only live 4 blocks away so my kids get to have the same beautiful relationship with my Dad & Mom and they understand the importance of being a family.

  7. Jessica Holst says:

    Among many life lessons I learned at my dad’s knee, the most important is probably “If it’s worth doing, it’s worth doing right.”

    It wasn’t until I was at college working in the dining center that I appreciated how he stood behind me in the kitchen making my 12 year old self re-do my slap-dash work for the umpteenth time. It wasn’t until I heard myself unconsciously quoting him when faced with peers who hadn’t been taught to do a job well, that I was thankful for his diligence in training me to be a conscientious employee. I now appreciate the value of meritorious work and am working to instill that same quality in my own children.

    Being a parent myself makes me fully aware of the fortitude it takes to make a child do a job well. It makes me even more grateful that he was willing to stick it out, and teach me how to do my best work in every task I undertake. I’m thankful he taught me well because raising children is definitely a job “worth doing right”.

  8. Alessandra Gutierrez says:

    My dad died while trying to save a child from drowning in a waterfall in our rain forest. What that taught me, I’m still discovering. Was is to be courageous, selfless, fearless? When faced with difficult decisions I think the most important lesson I learned from my dad was to do the right thing, the thing that will make all the difference.

  9. beckster says:

    My dad taught me how to fish. I can bait a hook, cast perfectly, and clean my catch. I even taught my husband how to fish! Just a few weeks ago a group of friends were fishing with their sons. I took the pole from my 4-year-old son to cast the line and one of the men rushed over and said, “let me get that for you.” I smiled and cast the line out perfectly at least fifty feet out with a perfect arch. It was great to see every mans’ jaw drop.

  10. DragonSlayerMama says:

    Get a colonoscopy. He died when I was eight of colon cancer. A colonoscopy saved my life.

  11. Danielle Brutsche says:

    I love this. My Dad taught me so many things, I don’t know where to begin… Here are a few. Sincerity, and respect in dealing with others; how to listen to all sides of an issue (even if you are sure your opinion is the right one. Especially then! –still working on perfecting that one-I fear it will be a life-long endeavor…). Humor and enthusiasm in all aspects of living (even if you make a bit of a fool of yourself or say something slightly inappropriate at times…). The ridiculousness of self-pity. I always hear his voice in my head when I’m feeling a little too sorry for myself- “better pick up that lower lip, kiddo. You might trip over it.” Ha! Isn’t that great? No one, least of all me or my siblings, could stay in a sulk around my Dad for very long. I miss him. There are so many times I would love to be able to talk to him and discuss things like we used to. he always had time for us and I never for a moment doubted his love for me. Even when I was being a rotten and rebellious teenager. I can’t believe he’s been gone for 20 years now.

    Alisa, I wanted to share a few lasting memories I have of your Dad. First was that time at the Neil Diamond concert, when that drunk buffoon shoved us and made us spill our Dr.Peppers on the ladies in front of us. Remember that? Your Mom said “Ron, take it outside!” And Ron took care of it. He made sure that that mean man wouldn’t be bothering us anymore and bought us and the drenched women in front of us new drinks. That was classy. Second, was when he took you and I to see “Rear Window” which was playing at the Inwood when we were 12 or 13. He was like “you girls need to be exposed to some real film-making. Enough of that Goonies (or whatever we were into at the time) nonsense!”. I was riveted. To this day I love classic films; Hichcock in particular, and “Rear Window” the most of all. And third: Your father introduced me to the ponies. Not to say I’m some sort of horse gambling addict these days, and of course I already loved horses and riding, but I do love going to the track and making little bets here and there on occasion, and I usually have pretty good luck! Good luck that started the time I went with y’all to Golden Gate Park and your Dad placed a bet for me on his horse to win. And it did! At 5 to 1 odds. Got to have my picture taken in the winner’s circle too. Good times and great memories.
    Love,
    Danielle

  12. Andrew Boer says:

    Haven’t seen the man in 20+ yrs. He looks good!

  13. Sherri Kuhn says:

    I adore this, you know that….and this picture? How he’s looking at you is priceless. Love you..

  14. Bromley says:

    My dad, as well as my paternal grandpa, taught me the importance of staying calm in the midst of difficult situations, be it related to relationships, work, or health. They also both taught me to chuckle, when appropriate, at the things in life that we take far too seriously, such as frustrating workplace drama – a reminder to ourselves that things are often exaggerated in our minds. A common phrase in our home, during my childhood, was “mind over matter”. For these lessons, I’m eternally grateful. They always trump the negativity that can take over our minds, in a too oft troubling world. More good is accomplished in a state of calm than in a state of anger.

  15. kellyg says:

    My father taught me so many valuable lessons, but the most important was this: Be prepared to defend what you believe in. When I was in high school, I was (ok, and probably still am) a bleeding-heart liberal, and I came home from debate class one day disgusted that so many of my conservative classmates thought that welfare should be totally eliminated. My father proceeded to tell me that he agreed with them, and that he couldn’t think of a single reason why he should be paying taxes to support a bunch of deadbeats. Coming from my former hippie dad, I was outraged and prepared to mount a passionate defense. After listening to my arguments, he said, “I want you to know I totally agree with you, but I also wanted to make sure you knew why this issue was important to you.” His worst fear was to have daughters that ran around spouting off ideals based on party lines, religious doctrine, or even our family values. Rather, he wanted us to become independent thinkers and encouraged the pursuit of intellectual excellence.

  16. Tamara S Arndt says:

    Growing up, my father taught me many valuable, life-lessons. Where to start? He taught me to stand up for myself when I was being bullied. He taught me to continue to love unconditionally and not give up on love, when my heart was broken. He taught me to respect the older generation, whose backs this country was built on and who fought many wars. He taught me to show respect for our military and to love my country, and my heritage. He told me to never let anyone take my freedoms away from me. He showed me to work hard and to give when I was able to. I know that if it weren’t for my father, I would have dropped out of high school. Instead I went from being kicked out of one school for multiple fights and suspensions, to graduating with multiple scholarships and college-bound. I knew what I wanted out of life, and I met a wonderful husband who I’ve been married to for over 8-years now. I have my own life and my own family, and I believe with all of my heart that it was because of the strength my father gave me. He never treated me like a princess, but he made me feel confident and brave. Even now, that I am nearly 30 and he is 85, I still rest my head on his frail shoulders when I can. I still cry with him. He still gives me advice. He has Alzheimer’s now. I only hope that I have told him enough how much I love him, and that he sees what he did for me and my life. It’s hard to watch my superman become so vulnerable and helpless, but he’s still in there. He’s always there, ready to save the day.

  17. Sarah Richards Casey says:

    My father never heard I love you from either of his parents. They never showed any sort of affection towards their kids or each other. That really saddens me. I’m an only child, while growing up I was, and still am, a daddy’s girl. Even though we live so far away, in different states, he always tells me he loves me. Everyday until the day I moved away, he would kiss me on my forehead and tell me that he loves me. This is really important to me. I’m now happily married and we have a 3.5 year old daughter and we make sure she knows that she’s loved. Not just by hearing it, but feeling it too.

  18. Megan Hart says:

    My Dad never lets a commercial break pass without an instant wrestle match, a lecture on life, or a discussion on sports or my future. My family immediately knows when his game or show goes on commercial, because the next two minutes and twenty seconds includes one of us being wrestled off the couch, or the computer, or where ever we are throughout the house. My Dad never lets an opportunity pass to include us with the rest of the family or just pin us to the ground, laughing as we struggle to be free. To this day, he continues to teach us to take every opportunity presented to us, even if we are worried of the outcome. From those two minutes and twenty seconds of wrestling (and I still cannot manage to free myself) to lectures of not being scared to take the opportunity, I am thankful my Dad continues to stress this lesson. Thank you, Dad!

  19. Lori Garcia says:

    My dad always said, “You can pick your friends, you can pick your nose but you can’t pick your friend’s nose.” — Truer words were never spoken.

  20. Anonymous says:

    Stay away from men until you are 40! I should have listened! :-)

  21. Bethany Gill says:

    My dad taught me many lessons in faith and love, but none like October of 2009. As my husband was lying in a coma in the hospital and doctor’s told me he would not survive my father held me in his arms and cried with me. He never left my side through the whole ordeal. He prayed with me, and over me. He visited Josh everyday when he could and when he couldn’t be there he was praying for him. My husband made a miraculous recovery and not only survived his accident, a three day coma, and an experimental treatment, but walked away with no side affects whatsoever. God taught me alot during that ordeal. He taught me that even though I am a grown woman with a family of my own I still need my daddy to hold me and comfort me, and teach me what it is to have faith in a God who is mightier than the rest of us. If my dad had not been there from the beginning of the whole thing I think I would have crumbled. He was a rock for me to lean on, he was the voice of reason I needed, and most importantly he was my prayer partner.

  22. Kellie O'Shields says:

    Stay away from boys til I’m 40! I should’ve listened! :-)

  23. Anonymous says:

    Dad taught me how to fly fish and tie flies. Most importantly, he taught me that there aren’t many problems that can’t be fixed by spending a quiet morning casting a line over a cool stream. This was pre-”A River Runs Through It”.

  24. Laurie Hansen Fairbanks says:

    My dad always said, “it’s nice to be nice.” There really no reason to treat people otherwise. The nicer you are to someone, the harder it is for them to treat you poorly. Also, having a reputation of being nice to EVERYONE will get you a lot farther in life.

  25. Molly Norton says:

    My Dad taught me how to fly fish and tie flies. Most importantly, he taught me that there aren’t many problems that can’t be fixed by spending a quiet morning casting a line over a cool stream. This was pre-”A River Runs Through It”.

  26. sarah says:

    teaching me to swim and how to catch frogs!!

  27. Kim Varner says:

    Slow down going into a curve and speed up coming out. Best advice ever!

  28. Sharon McAndrews Burkey says:

    My Dad has given me in human form how my Heavenly Father loves me. He loves me unconditionally, supports & forgives me when I’ve done wrong,listens to me in whatever mood I’m in & lets me vent my feelings, makes my mistakes into constructive ways, showed me as I was growing up of what to look for in a husband, and gives me His perspective even when I am stubborn not to listen at the moment!I have the BEST DAD! Read more…http://steppingbackintimecherishedcookbooks.blogspot.com/2010/06/today-is-fathers-day.html

  29. LooLoosMommy says:

    I have only a handful of memories of my father. One of the best is him leaving me at six in the middle of a frozen pond so I could learn to skate. The best fatherly lessons I have learned have been watching my husband with our daughter. It has taught me the importance of family and having someone who will always be there for you. My husband is a better father than I could have ever imagine existed. Our daughter is his world and he simply adores her. Just seeing how he looks at our daughter melts my heart. I know neither of us could find a better husband or father. I am thankful everyday that she and I have him in our lives, I don’t know how we ever got so lucky.

  30. Anna Labutina says:

    My dad said, “take off your shoes and feel the grass between your toes. It’ll make you remember to enjoy the simple things in life”. I plan on teaching my children the same exact point…

  31. amber says:

    My dad has taught me to never give up. I didn’t have a great childhood growing up and my dad had to work really hard to provide everything we have. I now cherish everything I have with my husband and son and I’ve learned life isn’t about material things its about enjoying what you have and the love you have for your family and friends.

  32. Randi says:

    I could write a book on how many lessons he has taught me, but one stands out. His mom died a couple of months before I was born. When I was around 7 years old, he told me that he would rather have another day with her than all the riches and fame the world could offer and went on to further emphasize the importance of cherishing family and those you love. He also demonstrated the ability to press on in life after tragedy strikes. That lesson became more valuable to me when my mother passed away when I was 12. He has been a rock and comfort as we have walked through some of our darkest days together. I love that man more than words.

  33. Anonymous says:

    Blood doesn’t a family make. My dad (actually my step-dad, but he’ll always be my dad) taught my brothers and I (2 that are technically half brothers, and 1 that would actually be like a step-son once removed from my dad) through example that family is the people that show up, that mean something to you, and you to them. I’ve carried that lesson with me throughout my life and have applied the same to my step-daughter. She is my daughter and he is her Grampy even if we share no blood at all…any of us. He has always told me as he looked upon my older “brother” and I that being in a child’s life pays you back ten-fold. I couldn’t agree more.

  34. Abbey Wallace says:

    My dad died when I was 18 its not a lesson he taught me directly from my mouth but it taught me to not take things for granted. It also taught me no matter how you feel about people you love you should put aside anger and frustration and always let them know you love them. He died on a business trip and we didnt get to talk that day or say good bye. Its been 3 years and I still put aside differences with loved ones because I don’t want something to happen and anger and hate to be a last memory

  35. Rufus Griscom says:

    Another one from my poppa, passed down in the family (and probably a saying from another source): it’s nice to be important, but it’s more important to be nice. Another: always deliver more than people expect.

  36. Shannon Qualls says:

    My dad taught me to laugh at myself. I have a moderate to severe hearing loss that I used to take so seriously, getting upset if anyone would even hint at a joke about it. My dad taught me it is okay to laugh about it and to have a sense of humour.

  37. Rufus Griscom says:

    Here’s another piece of advice I love from my father: Each person has a finite amount of energy or life force. One of the many lovely illusions of youth is that your supply of life force is infinite, or you can manufacture more at will, but in fact you learn as you get olde that your reserves are finite. Anxiety erodes life force — you could think of anxiety as friction that dissipates energy as heat. You therefore want to keep anxiety to a minimum if you want to have a highly productive life. Living beyond your means is likely to increase anxiety and thereby erode your energy.

    My father gave me this piece of advice when I asked him whether or not I should buy an apartment that was a budgetary reach for us. I did not take his advice — we bought the apartment anyway — but it’s always stuck with me.

    I think this is one of the better arguments for always being honest and treating people well. If you are not a sociopath, dishonesty and even the smallest imbroglio with another person will cause you anxiety. The cumulative effect of this can create a lot of anxiety and erode or misdirect energy. So even if you don’t buy the “always be honest and err on the side of treating people as you would like to be treated” argument on ethical grounds, or game theory grounds, it ends up making for a happier and more productive life on conservation of energy grounds.

  38. Tamilyn Jones says:

    My dad taught me to be respectful to my elders,never let the little things in life go unnoticed and to always be loving and kind even when someone is being out of hand. Always to kill with kindness so as to set an example for other on how to treat one another. So that maybe by example others would act the same. Also to Pay it forward when someone does something kind or helpful to you to keep the spread of kindness going. My dad was a wonderful man and we miss him dearly!

  39. Jennifer Marie Miller says:

    That life, and everything in it, is better when it’s shared.

  40. Sensible Girlfriend says:

    My father, who grew up in Chinese military schools, whose parenting style went way beyond the tiger-mother, was a violent, sadistic, abusive rage-aholic. He unintentionally taught me optimism, finding inner peace, unlimitless inner strength, a belief in myself, to relish humor and joy and also about attracting beauty, love and goodness in the world. Watching him shatter and destroy all the potentially great things in his life was beyond distressing, but an invaluable lesson. I am thankful that he is my father and that I experienced these great mental, emotional and physical pains so that I can have compassion and understanding for those in similar situations or other dire straits. Because of this emotionally rich perspective, I can help others in my daily life and through my blog sensiblegirlfriend.com. If I could magically go back in time, I wouldnt change a thing. These unintentional lessons from my father are the greatest gift and lead to this incredibly joyful, fulfilling life I have today.
    Copyright 2011 sensiblegirlfriend.com

  41. JoAnne Thomas says:

    My Pop has taught me so many POWS ( pearls of wisdom ).
    I was taught to always LEAD, not to Follow.
    Never to judge someone, and give a firm handshake.
    Treat everyone the same.
    Always stand up for what you believe in, doesn’t matter what it is – just stand up for it.
    Always give your seat up for elderly.
    Most importantly, to make your OWN path in this life. Even if that means that you have to trudge thru weeds and stumble… Pop said if you believe in that path, follow it, and the next person won’t have it so hard.
    Thanks Pop, for being an amazing role model and my best friend!!

  42. Danielle Long says:

    My dad taught me how to love.. Not just family and friends but people with diseases and disabilities.. He also taught me how to respect and treat everyone the same no matter what color they are

  43. Becky Bartlett says:

    My Dad taught me how to always respect my elders, always help a friend in need because one day you will need help. He taught me how to bait my own fishing hook and how to take the fish off because if your gonna fish you must learn to do it yourself. He taught me to appreciate the stories the old timers tell you because they really know what it means to live through the hard times. I Love my Dad?

  44. Benitabj says:

    My dad taught me that being out of control is unnecessary. There are consequences for everything and if I went in to many of life’s trials aware of this then there would be no reason to be running around like a crazy lady.

  45. Meredith Gill says:

    My dad taught me right from jump street that, “Boys who love you don’t hit you.” He said it all the time, and if my older brother got rough with me Daddy would say it to my brother in front of me. If Danny pushed me, he’d get the lecture, and it always ended the same way, “Why don’t we push your sister?” “Because boys who love her don’t push her.” Years later, a guy I’d been dating for a few months slapped me, and it was like flipping on a light switch. The only thing I heard was my dad’s voice saying, “Boys who love you don’t hit you.” I was out he door in no time flat. Thank you, Daddy!

  46. Jill Bernis says:

    My Dad taught me to question everything and to trust my gut. To be a leader and not follow blindly. To stand up for what I think is right and to never ever quit. He taught me to be who I am and treat everyone with respect no matter their station in life. Most of all he taught me that family is number one because it is the one thing that cannot be replaced. Thanks Dad, I love you.

  47. Kimberly Beauchamp says:

    Always treat others how you want to be treated. He also taught me to love unconditionally.

  48. Ally Kennedy says:

    The most important thing my dad taught me how to do is budget my money. My hubby says “how to be a cheapskate” but I like to refer to it as being frugal! During this particular time in my life, it’s paying off more than ever (7 months pregnant & out of work)!

  49. Cindi Egress Castelli says:

    My Father taught me never to lose faith no matter what and to be a humble person. Daddy was the Best person! He developed ALS at the age of 70 years of age. He was a PTSD vet and liked to work so he did not have to think. He remoled my house, planted thousand of flowers for my enjoyment. The ALS came and all he could do was think after his muscles slowly melted away. He never talked about people and he always smiled and kept his Christrian faith. As the Dr’s removed his life support they said he would not wake up and he would die. He did wake up and we got to talk and he was still smiling as his life here on this earth slipped away to a better place. I honor his humbleness and his faith and am PROUD to Have Called him Dad!!! Rest in Peace Daddy, I love you forever and more.

  50. Sara Larane Savel says:

    My dad grew up with a severely abusive mother. Yet he was able to transcend that and become this amazing loving father who always accepted and delighted in me. Of all the lessons he taught me that I listed during his eulogy in 2006, this, by far, was the lesson that means the most to me in my parenting.

  51. Angie Himes says:

    My Dad taught me to be true to my family, to NEVER run away from a problem, not to quit when it gets tough, and that even if people say you can’t do something the only one who decides if you can’t do it or not is yourself!! Love you Dad!!!!

  52. Serena Fuson says:

    My dad taught me how to survive. I learned how to fish and hunt at a very young age.

  53. Monica Barnes says:

    My dad taught me to love music and always have it be a part of my life.

  54. Kristen M says:

    My dad often said, “Hindsight is 20/20″. This phrase has taught me to look back to reflect on and appreciate the lessons taught from life’s experiences.

  55. Miranda Hatch says:

    My Dad taught me to find an amazing husband to become an amazing Dad just like he was! And I did that, my husband of 14 1/2 years and our 3 sons together.

  56. Diana Wright says:

    My father granted so many pearls of wisdom, directly and indirectly. He taught me to let go, patience, sacrifice, bonds, commitment, mistakes,and triumphs he taught me defence, proper etiquete , and right from wrong, the piano , ‘to relax and smell the roses”, he showed me its not shamefull to cry and be sad, he showed me the joy of laughter,He showed me that a child can give an adult good advice and to leave. He was one in a million,and our short time together he taught me so much.He was my Dad.

  57. Amy Blakeney says:

    My dad taught me I could do anything I set my mind to. We put a front end on a car, I helped with house maintenance, and all that stuff that needs to be done around a home. As a result, I am willing to try to do just about anything.

  58. Anonymous says:

    My father taught me to never judge a person by how they look or speak. Color of skin, facial features, special qualities, and everything that has to do with a person and their difference from myself. He also taught me to never live with regret and live for my dreams. To not expect from others but give all I can. To give to the people in need & except nothing in return. To love like it’s your last day to love & express your love always because u never know when it will be the last time to share Ur love to whomever u need to.

  59. Norma Meheski says:

    I posted the comment about my father teaching me not to judge & how to love & live with no regret

  60. Chana Posen says:

    my father taught me to use every opportunity as a learning experience

  61. Corinne Kurzmann says:

    My father was killed in 1967 when I was 4..What he did teach me was that life is short and precious and to not waste a moment of it!

  62. Samantha Kim Morris says:

    My dad taught me to be a loving & caring person. Treat others more highly than yourself & be humble. He lost his dad when he was 9 years old, so he knew how hard things can be w/o a dad, so he has made every effort to be there for me. I am 35 years old & still enjoy hanging out with him.

  63. Diania Selph Dickerson says:

    “Ain’t ain’t a word, and you ain’t supposed to say it. Say ain’t five times and you ain’t going to ain’t going to heaven.” “if I told you once, I’ve told you a million times, don’t exaggerate” and many other words of wisdom.

  64. JulieQ says:

    My Dad taught me how to be a strong person. After my parents divorced when I was 5 he was left to take care of 4 girls by himself. He worked hard everyday so we didn’t miss out on anything just because our mom wasn’t there. It wasn’t until I was grown that I realized what a rough time he must have been facing when I was very young. He never complained or asked for help, he did what he had to for his daughters. When I think my world is falling apart I think of the strength my Daddy showed us all those years and I know can get through anything. He’s my rock.

  65. Sharle Julie Qualls says:

    I posted the JulieQ comment

  66. Kellie Wilson says:

    He taught me to have compassion for EVERYONE and to learn to forgive, always!

  67. Karole Lee says:

    My dad’s biggest lesson to us kids was, “It’ll feel good when it quits hurtin’.” For me it was a lesson in how to fail… learn from it!

  68. Tian H says:

    My dad taught me to keep learning and keep praying for a happy ending. but if it didn’t happen in this world, i’ll have it beyond..

  69. Newbie Mum says:

    He taught me to build a successful life of off a foundation of education. One of my last memories with him is of him telling me, “Marry for love not looks.” I think I did it right :)

  70. Elizabeth Lovejoy Knauss says:

    My Dad taught me how to survive the Siberian tundra-like weather of upstate New York in case I got locked out of my house. He would always tell me to, “hide under a leaf pile because its really warm”, like I wouldn’t just go to the neighbor’s house.

  71. Candice Goodell says:

    My dad taught me to take one day at a time. And live life to the fullest you only live once

  72. Lena Toulhoat Naef says:

    My dad taught me to try my best at everything I do!

  73. Kayla Lockhart says:

    My dad taught me to never give up even when things get tough.

  74. Elizabeth Pyo says:

    Since my dad passed when I was 6 the one thing I can remember of my dad is that he was really generous even though he didn’t have much. I’m like that now =)

  75. Chris Juden Wuensche says:

    My dad taught me how to drive a stick shift car. He told me if you can drive a “stick”, you can drive anything. He was right!

    He also taught me a great work ethic! “Work hard and do your best!” At the end of the day….you will be smiling”

    He also taught me that God and Family are the most important things in life.

  76. Anonymous says:

    My dad taught me that life is not fair and we can’t always get what we want!

  77. Tatiana Delgado says:

    My dad really did teach me to not sweat the small stuff :)

  78. Kelsey Lamb Brooks says:

    My dad always was positive, and always always had a sense of humor. I think they are amazing traits to teach your child.

  79. Kelsey Lamb Brooks says:

    the importance of a sense of humor in life among other things, maybe the most important!

  80. Anonymous says:

    My dad taught the importance of life how to live life to the max and that you only live once.I personally think this was the best thing he ever taught me :)

  81. Betsy says:

    My Dad pasessed on a great work ethic, he tought me also to help people that where down on there luck and never expected anything in return.

  82. Jennifer Sweet says:

    my dad said only a fool makes an enemy when he dosen’t have to, and when he didn’t like my friends he said, if you lay down with dogs you will get up with fleas.

  83. CJ F says:

    My dad tried to really impress upon me how quickly time seems to pass after you turn around 40 yrs. of age, whenever I was in my 20′s. I’d already felt that swiftness of time passing, but still…it was something that has always stuck with me, because he sounded so sad, so thrown that time could have passed him by so quickly.

  84. mamaesq says:

    Never back up more than you have to. Ignored it once: accident.

  85. Julie Thomas says:

    never to ‘burn your bridges’, especially with an employer – you will never know if you will want a reference from them one day.

  86. Karen Painter says:

    My dad gave me the wonderful gift of the love of gardening. I helped him to work in the garden for many happy hours. He grew lots of fruit, vegetables and flowers and I have followed in his footsteps and spend as much time as possible tending my plot.

  87. Mia Rose says:

    My father taught me to “Always do what’s right “, even when other’s are not conducting themselves like descent individuals. (Even more important then) . And recently over the last few years, I had that “Ahh ‘moment, my active duty husband of (17) years decided he didn’t want to be married any longer or return home after a 9 month deployment. Well,I was upset, hurt, angry, crazy …and thought “why should I pack his stuff “,then that voice of years prior slipped in and said “Mia, do the right thing “,and while putting household goods in storage 1300 miles later, I saw some paperwork …with people’s vital info on them, military uses ss#’s to identify people …had I left ‘his “stuff, innocent people could have suffered identity theft!!!! So, the seed and moral my Father planted, guided me unknowingly to do a much bigger, kinder gesture and by doing so ….saved many people possible hardship due to (1)person’s poor choice, so even when it’s difficult, or it hurts emotionally …it’s those times it’s even more important to “Do THE RIGHT THING “..It’s worth it!!!

  88. Amy Bolda Pugmire says:

    My father taught me to never give up! To be a strong and positive person and enjoy life! treat others how you would want to be treated! He is a great example to me and his lessons in life never stop. He is now battling stage 4 terminal lung cancer and he has become even more positive and determined to beat this! He is wonderful example to everyone around them. He has taught me family is the most important and they will always be there for you. He has touched so many lives around him and strives to be a better person everyday! Thanks for all you do dad! I love you!

  89. Anonymous says:

    my father taught me to swim, ride a bike and tie my shoes, but best of all dad taught me the love of a father is unconditional!

  90. Bogusia Buss says:

    MY FATHER TAUGHT ME TO WORK HARD.. DON’T COMPLAIN.. BE STRONG.. PERSEVERE IN ALL YOU DO..BECAUSE SOONER OR LATER EVERYTHING WILL WORK OUT FOR THE BETTER.

  91. Janelle Zipagang says:

    My dad has taught me so many good lessons in life. I couldn’t choose any one of them as being better than the other, so here’s a random one: my dad taught me to ride a bike when I was in elementary school, probably around the 3rd grade. I wanted to learn to ride for so long. I begged my dad for seemingly forever to get me a bike and teach me how to ride it. Finally, I was so excited when he bought me a used pink bike, even though it was just barely too big for me. One afternoon, he took me to a nearby ally next to the library because no one would be there for me to run over. Unfortunately, the ally had a slope. He sat me on top of the hill, gave me instructions, and assured me that the hill wasn’t as big as I thought it was. I was terrified, but I really wanted to learn how to ride a bike, so he told me to just hold the bike straight, pedal and go. That’s how I learned to ride a bike. Not only that, that’s how I learned that in life, in order to reach your goals, you some times have to just get on the bike and pedal. Emotions like fear and doubt will try to stop you, but if you want something badly enough, then suck up the emotions and just make it happen. People, like my dad, will be there to guide me with instructions and are rooting for me to succeed, but it’s my choice to take life by the handle bars and to pedal or not. Plus, I knew that if I ever fell in anything in life, my dad was right behind me to pick me up and help me get back on the bike to watch me succeed.

  92. Barbi Stroup says:

    Live each day like a child. He said have you ever noticed how a young child get’s so much joy out of the simplest events like climbing onto a chair for the first time. They clap, they smile and they laugh when they first accomplish a simple task and will say I did it with a smile on their face. He told me to hold on to every small accomplishment and revel in the success before it’s over. My dad is no longer with us but he did teach me to have a good time every day no matter what you are going through.

  93. Melissa Hartley says:

    Once in junior high, I got a note calling me to the office. When I got there, both my dad and older sister were there. I didn’t know why but he said he needed to take us somewhere that day. There was a record low tide that day; he wanted to take us to the beach. We had so much fun. A week or so later, I skipped school. He was so mad. He told me how disappointed he was in me, especially since he recently did take us out of school to enjoy the low tide. I guess what my dad taught was that it’s OK to play and have fun and celebrate if you have a good reason, but breaking rules just because and shirking off responsibility for mere boredom is not only bad but a disservice to yourself.

  94. Shannon says:

    My dad taught me to be funny. We are both hilarious.

  95. Gwyn says:

    My dad was my biggest cheerleader that I, a female he and my mom were raising in a conservative Christian way, could do and be anything, and that is was in line with Biblical views on women.

  96. NativeAustinite says:

    As a young adult, I struggled with leaving an unsuccessful relationship. My dad shared with me his experience as a single adult; he said, “Being alone does not have to be the same as being lonely.” This window into his emotional existence was a special vision from such a loving, but quiet guy. It helped me many times in the following years not only to move on, but to know myself and find my own path to happiness.

  97. Jessica Power Braun says:

    By his example, my dad taught me to be a non-conformist. He honestly does not care what people think. Like, at all. If he feels like speed walking around town wearing tight sweatpants and ankle weights, or is in the mood to cruise down a main road in a recumbent bike, or decides that parachute pants and a Jets sweatshirt fits into the category of business casualwell, no one is going to change his mind. Especially not my mother.

  98. Christine M Tubbytelly says:

    My father taught me to never let others’ opinions stop me from being who I am. I express myself how I feel comfortable. My dad made me the individual I am today.

  99. Aspen says:

    Wheoevr wrote this, you know how to make a good article.

  100. Mildred says:

    I went to tons of links brefoe this, what was I thinking?

  101. Janae says:

    I bow down hulmby in the presence of such greatness.

  102. Irene says:

    Very true! Makes a cgahne to see someone spell it out like that. :)

  103. Dollie says:

    I?m not wrohty to be in the same forum. ROTFL

  104. Allayna says:

    Hey, that’s porweful. Thanks for the news.

  105. Ethanael says:

    Hey, that’s pofwerul. Thanks for the news.

  106. Mina says:

    Kudos! What a neat way of tihinkng about it.

  107. Regina says:

    Was totally stuck until I read this, now back up and runinng.

  108. Nelly Frect says:

    it seems like a great article but you will enjoy this one more read here…http://is.gd/Yo5fib

  109. Nelly Frect says:

    it seems like a great article but you will enjoy this one more read here…http://is.gd/Yo5fib

  110. Nelly Frect says:

    it seems like a great article but you will enjoy this one more read here…http://is.gd/Yo5fib

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *.