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Locator Chips Used to Track Students

Tiny chips similar to this are embedded in students T-shirts.

If you could track your kid with a microchip would you? Or is it an invasion of privacy?

 

As CBSAtlanta reports, 20,000 elementary students in Brazil are using uniforms embedded with locator chips that help alert parents if they’re cutting classes. The Brazilian government isn’t messing around. It has invested nearly $700,000 into the microchip program. The chips even have a security system that makes trying to remove them almost impossible.

The students attend 213 public schools in the city of Vitoria da Conquista. The microchips – similar to those used to track lost pets – were embedded in T-shirts and earlier this week the students started wearing them. The city’s education secretary, Coriolano Moraes, tells CBS that by 2013 all of the city’s 43,000 public school students, aged 4 to 14, will be using the chip-embedded T-shirts.

The chips work by sending radio frequencies to a computer that marks when children enter school. Parents are alerted if their kids don’t show up 20 minutes after classes begin with this text: “Your child has still not arrived at school.”

“We noticed that many parents would bring their children to school but would not see if they actually entered the building because they always left in a hurry to get to work on time,” Moraes said in a telephone interview. “They would always be surprised when told of the number times their children skipped class.

The education secretary says these students in Brazil may be guinea pigs for the world. “I believe we may be setting a trend because we have received many requests from all over Brazil for information on how our system works,” he said.

What do you think? Do you like the idea or would you rather your child earn your trust the old-fashioned way?

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