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Mensa Club For Kids: Is Your Child THAT Smart? Here is How To Find OUt

Being  a Mensa Club member gives you a cache, and lots of it. You’re the one people call when they need a Millionaire lifeline, the one with who can rattle off all the state’s capitals (in alphabetical order), the one wearing the Mensa T-shirt. But maybe you don’t have the big brain and the even bigger IQ that is needed to be a card carrying member of the elite club for the super smart. But never fear, perhaps it isn’t you who is destined for brainiac-dom, maybe it is your son or daughter who has is the brains in the family. Wanna prove it?

The Mensa club takes members whose brains are in vessels that aren’t fully grown. For those who are are 14 and older, there is the Mensa Admission Test which can take your friendly local American Mensa volunteer proctor. Or you can submit evidence of prior testing, which is what you would for the under for 14 smarty pants set. And there is wide range of test that can be admitted, about 200 or so like the Stanford Binet Test, Woodcock-Johnson Test, or the Cognitive Abilities Test. But your kid? They’ll have to be in the 98th percentile.

There are some Mensa members who are very young, probably too young to even correctly pronounce Mensa. Georgia Brown and Elise Tan Roberts were both just two-years-old when they joined. But what would a two-year-old gain from being a Mensa member? Bragging rights at the playground or preschool wouldn’t carry much weight for their peers. A new Zu Zu pet or a fuzzy bunny? Now we’re talking.

Do you think getting young kids to join Mensa is just a way for parents to be proud or do you think there is something beneficial in it?

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