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Mighty Mouse (and Facebook) Saves the Day

Facebook's cartoon campaign reaps rewards for charities

Mighty Mouse is among the cartoon characters who recently made an appearance on Facebook

Facebook has been accused of being many things, including a waste of time, an invasion of privacy and an almost certain guarantee that those photos of you from that frat party in college will come back to haunt you during a future job interview.

But as it turns out, it’s also getting more than a few pats on the back of late. Around the time people on Facebook started changing their profile pictures to nostalgic cartoon characters, purportedly to eliminate violence against children, charities for children actually reported seeing a surge in donations.

While the origins of the cartoon character campaign appear to be murky or even entirely unknown, the recipients of the campaign aren’t complaining. With an increase in charitable contributions, website traffic and attention, organizations like ChildHelp, a nonprofit dedicated to the prevention and treatment of child abuse and neglect, are basking in the glow of a brighter spotlight for their causes.

While ChildHelp is a national organization, even smaller, local charities have seen a fatter cushion in their coffers since the onslaught of Mighty Mouses and Betty Boops on Facebook last week, according to TechDailyNews.com.

As for the fears and rumors that the Facebook cartoon campaign was fueled by a group of pedophiles who were using it as a smokescreen to gain better access to children, a Facebook spokesperson says that’s not the case.

The campaign on Facebook was set to expire yesterday, although many of the cartoon profile pictures remain, and the hope of the children’s charities, of course, is that the donations will keep flooding in for as long as possible.

Over 2 million reports of child abuse or neglect are logged nationally each year.

Image: Flickr

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