Modest Fashions Are In For Teen Girls

Are teen fashion trends really heading towards less trashy looks?

Parents everywhere can breathe a sigh of relief over this New York Times’ back to school fashion piece: teenage girls are tired of tight clothing.

Skimpy is out; “grandma chic” is in. Girls are shopping for oversize sweaters and high-waisted jeans this fall, leaving the miniskirts on the rack.

Almost nothing makes me want my own daughters to grow up faster, but if this fashion trend is real, I kind of wish it were happening during their teen years. I’d love for them to come of age at a moment where girls’ are encouraged to develop their sense of style and beauty without being pressured to show off their bodies.

The kids interviewed in the New York Times piece are more fashion-conscious than I ever was as a teen. They’re taking their cues from runway models and major designers, not the kids sitting next to them in English class. The looks they’re coming up with are pretty familiar to me though: those fashion runways seem to be mining my own early 90s high school looks for ideas. As one kid put it:

Ms. Callis noted that she approves of the ’90s, which fashion seems to be mining. “You couldn’t even tell what anyone’s bodies looked like,” she said approvingly, while eyeing a cocoon sweater that was “very Alexander Wang.”

I can’t say I care much about Alexander Wang, but I love a world in which teenage girls are happy to have the contours of their bodies at least somewhat obscured by their clothes. Not that everyone needs to be draped in slouchy sweaters all the time, but feeling free to be comfortable rather than always on display has got to be a good thing. Several of the girls interviewed in the NYT talked about respecting themselves and their bodies as they searched for fall fashions.

Can this trend please last forever? Or at least till my preschooler is all grown up?

 

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