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Mommy's Clubbing Attire Offends Teacher

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Let’s say you’re an elementary school teacher and your students’ moms show up to a parent conference in low cut shirts, mini skirts or tight jeans.  Would it be appropriate to write a note asking them to dress “discreetly” for conferences instead? A rather humorous letter was sent to advice columnist “Ask Amy” in The Los Angeles Times earlier this week…

Pat, a 59-year-old teacher (who says she is not a prude), wrote a letter about how inappropriate she thinks it is when parents wear so-called clubbing attire parent-teacher meetings. She doesn’t want to see cleavage and low-cut shirts. Her idea to put an end to the risque outfits is to send a note requesting for parents to dress in a more discreet manner.

I remember watching the Real Housewives of the OC a few years ago and being a bit surprised by some of the plunging necklines those ladies wore to their kid’s events. I don’t think I’m a prude, but it is right to parade your bosoms in those types of situations? On one hand, the human body is beautiful so why not show it off. On the other hand, must you wear that particular shirt to that particular event? There are other options hanging in your closet.

The response is interesting, because Amy gives the teacher’s idea a C- and says the following, “As a teacher, you know that the most important thing is not how people look, but how they behave. Are these parents listening to you attentively? Are they asking questions and showing a willingness to be active partners in their child’s education? If they are, then their cleavage issues should be immaterial.”

What do you think? Are these moms being disrespectful or is this teacher Prudy McPrude?

Image: Dame Magazine

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