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Mother of the Year Sells Naming Rights to her Unborn Child for $5,000

Belly Ballot

It’s a mystery, alright

Like many people, Natasha Hill has some credit card debt she’d like to get rid of. She’d also like to save for her child’s college education.

Unlike other people, however, who recognize that money doesn’t come for free and they need to work and save to make those things happen, Hill has decided to sell something very precious to try and get ahead: the right to name her unborn child.

According to the New York Daily News, Hill entered a contest on BabyNames.net for the chance to win $5,000 and let total strangers name her baby. If she uses a name other than the ones voted on by the public on the baby’s birth certificate, she doesn’t get the cash.

Hill, 26, said that since she was having trouble coming up with a name on her own, she thought she’d try this instead (quick! someone get her a BABY NAME book, for chrissake).

Never mind that she’s not due until September and still has plenty of time to figure out a name on her own (and, again, they sell these books and have these websites that offer lists upon lists of BABY NAMES), and never mind that the $5,000 is probably taxable and unless her credit card debt is less than four figures and her kid goes to a state school — is that really enough money to make this worth it?

Hill’s boyfriend is (rightly) concerned that they’ll get stuck with some weird celebrity name or some misspelled disaster of a name.

She says she’s already thought that through, however, and if they end up with a wacky moniker, she’ll “just have to give the baby a really good nickname.”

Oh, so she can think of a nickname but not a real name? Awesome.

Photo credit: iStockphoto

More from Meredith on Babble’s Mom blog:

Read (even) more from Meredith at Babble’s Toddler blog, follow her on Twitter, and check out her weekly column on the Op-Ed page of The Denver Post at MeredithCarroll.com

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