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New Airline Rule Good for Parents

flyingIf you listen to the parents prepping for a flight with their kids this Christmas, air travel with children is the pits. But the Department of Transportation may have just made one rule that will make things easier on parents.

Beginning in April, no domestic flight will be allowed to sit on the tarmac for more than three hours.

At the two-hour mark, they’ll be required to feed you and the kids – even if it’s a budget flight that ordinarily forgoes snacks.

In a press release announcing the change, U.S. Transportation Secratary Ray LaHood said, “Airline passengers have rights, and these new rules will require airlines to live up to their obligation to treat their customers fairly.”

What makes this rule especially good for parents? Nearly every media report on the rule has cited the complaint of crying babies or parents running out of diapers . . . something that points the finger at kids on planes.

It’s hard enough to keep your kid’s occupied and keep up with enough snacks, enough bottles, enough diapers, for a flight that reaches its destination on time. Sitting for eight hours on the tarmac on top of that? It’s more than the headache of your average passenger; it’s nightmare status. Because then you also have the actual flight ahead of you, after you’ve run through all your extras – and remember, you can’t take much on planes these days, so there’s only so much “extras” you can bring.

Adults can last a few hours without some food. Kids can’t. Adults can stay seated for a few extra hours. Kids can’t.

The only bad news – this rule won’t help holiday travelers, at least not this year. Have you ever been stuck on the tarmac for hours on end with a screaming kid?

Image: woodleywonderworks via flickr

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