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New Baby Chair Mimics Going for a Car Ride: Silly or Smart?

Is This the Next Best Thing to a Car Ride?

My child was not one of them, but I have known many a baby who stubbornly would not go to sleep unless they were driven around in the family car. Something about the movement, the gentle roar of the engine and maybe a bit of talk radio, it just lulled these finicky sleepers to slumber.

Apparently an enterprising inventor has heard the cries and sighs of all those parents driving the highways and byways aimlessly trying to get their babies to sleep. Enter Cruisin’ Motion Soother by the Fisher Price. According to the Mail Online,  “the seat mimics the movements and sounds of a car journey, including going over bumps, turning corners and even the gentle hum of the engine.” The parents will apparently save on time, effort and most importantly —gas, which is getting pretty costly. “Parents wanted something that could do the same job as a car seat but without the car.”

A Fisher-Price spokesperson said that the chair (which goes on sale in July), ” has a motor in the base and when you turn it on the chair moves ever so slightly.  The movements vary throughout to match the same kind of sensation the baby gets from being in a car. Sometimes you go over bumps or go round a corner or turn left or right. Those are repeated in the chair, but ever so slightly, so that the baby feels like it is back in the car. The noise that accompanies the movements completes it. Some chairs swing the baby around but this is more subtle.”

But don’t you want to have your baby get used to sleeping on something static like an old fashioned bed? Isn’t that part of the whole “sleep training” aspect? Will the kids have a harder time eventually sleeping on a mattress?

Is this new addition to baby gear-land silly or sensible and smart? Would you buy one?

Babble Reviews the Best Car Seats: Infant, Toddler, Convertible, and more!

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