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No Sweets For You! (If You Go To School In Massachusetts) (VIDEO)

Growing up in my house meant Oreos were a special treat, soda was an ‘almost never’ and potato chips were served with Dad’s Saturday Night Hamburgers.

But, Sabrina…. my friend up the street?  Well, she had free reign of all-things-sweet-and-salty.  And my friend Michelle… well, yikes!… sweets were forbidden in her house.  Guess who’s house we visited the most often?  And guess who was constantly in the pantry begging for more?

I certainly loved the allure of the options at Sabrina’s house, but I always felt bad for Michelle because she had NO options – and it meant she stuffed herself whenever she had the opportunity – because she knew the treats were a rarity for her.

This is only ONE of my concerns when it comes to the state of Massachusetts banning bake sales at schools – and according to the Boston Herald, hoping to take further steps – like banning sweets 24/7 for banquets, door-to-door candy sales and sporting events AND even eliminating other ‘junk’ like 2% milk and white bread.

The Masschusetts Department of Health and Education apparently believes these steps are necessary as 1/3 of the school’s students are affected by obesity.

I worry not only that ‘forbidding’ sweets doesn’t seem like the logical answer…. not simply that banning bake sales eliminates what has been, for MANY extracurricular groups, a source of much-needed revenue that the state DOESN’T provide, but also that a child’s diet should be regulated, in my opinion, by their parents.

Read more from Danielle on Strollerderby and her personal sites ExtraordinaryMommy and DanielleSmithMedia.

You can also follow her on Twitter.

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