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NYC Elementary School Bans Rainbow Loom. Why?

rainbow-loom-jewelry-e1376503941726If you have an elementary school-aged girl than you are very familiar with the newest must-have jewelry fad – the Rainbow Loom. Not only are your kids wearings wrist-fulls of them but parents themselves are sporting them with pride. As Liz Gumbinner of Mom-101 said in her post The New Mom Jewelry, “Just look at the wrist of any adult these days and you’ll know instantly who has spawned. It’s a faster way to say “mom” in 2013 than a breast milk stain on a silk shirt.”

Yes, the rainbow loom is EVERYWHERE. Well, almost everywhere. This week the colorful handmade plastic bracelets have been banned from Upper West Side elementary school in New York City. The school has put an end to the crafting craze saying that it is a distraction and is causing a conflict.

“The children are playing with the bracelets during class without permission from teachers. [They] are playing with them at recess, and it is causing conflict between children,” PS 87 Principal Suzan Federici wrote in a letter to parents in regards to the ban. “Therefore, starting immediately, your children are no longer allowed to bring any Rainbow Loom bracelets or the kits to school.”

I understand that the bracelets are a distraction and that they shouldn’t be played with in class, but it seems like crafting during recess would be a positive thing. The principal did mention that there were conflicts during recess as well, but don’t conflicts happen no matter what? A ball game or playing “house” can cause just as much conflict. One kid gets hit with a kick ball or Jenny doesn’t want to play the dad. Conflict in the schoolyard is universal, be it spawning from colored bands or any other form of play. But crafts is a creative process and seeing little girls embracing this trend is pretty darn sweet.

What do you think? Do you think that a band of rainbow looms is a practical decision or overkill.

Photo Source: Rainbow Loom

 

 

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