Previous Post Next Post

Mom

Brought to you by

OMG: Mom Sues After Educational Breastfeeding Video Ends Up Getting Edited into Porn Flick

By Meredith Carroll |

Breastfeeding

What's sicker: That someone posted the footage in an X-rated video or that 17,500 people watched it?

Many expectant and new moms learn the ins and outs of breastfeeding from other moms. Sometimes it’s through a class, sometimes it’s by watching a video.

MaryAnn Sahoury wanted to be one of those moms who helped others, so she consented at the behest of a lactation consultant to appear in an instructional video called “Breastfeeding Help,” which showed her nursing her baby daughter and was produced by a subsidiary of the very reputable Meredith Corp., according to the New York Daily News.

However, instead of the video being shared just among hospitals, doctors’ offices, lactation consultants and their clients, and other new moms looking for some breastfeeding tips, it ended up being the main attraction in a porn vide.

Sahoury wasn’t paid to be in the video but she was given assurances “that neither her name, nor her 1-month-old daughter’s name would be used.”

“Breastfeeding for me was the most rewarding thing I had ever done in my life,” Sahoury told NBC. “I wanted to share that with people. I wanted to really give back.”

Her mistake, however, was signing off on the release form without reading it. Had she read it, she would have seen she was signing her consent for Meredith to share the video “across all platforms.”

She discovered her grave error when she decided to google her name a few months later to see if the video had aired. That’s when she saw the video had been share on YouTube, where it was then taken by a third party and edited together with porn footage. Making matters worse, her full name and that of her daughter’s were featured in the X-rated flick.

“I was sick to my stomach,” Sahoury told the newspaper. “I didn’t know what I was going to do. I just felt so paralyzed.”

It took months for Meredith to remove the X-rated YouTube video — and even then it was only at her request. By then, it had been seen over 15,000 times and it still showed up 24 hours after it was removed, amassing an additional 2,500 views.

Could you blame Sahoury for taking the producer of the educational video to court for fraud, negligent misrepresentation, breach of contract, negligent infliction of emotional distress and equitable fraud? Because she was given the green light to do it this week by a federal judge.

Here’s hoping she sues the pants off of them when the trial begins later this year, and that someone captures it on film and posts it on YouTube.

Photo credit: iStock

More on Babble

About Meredith Carroll

meredith-carroll

Meredith Carroll

Meredith C. Carroll is an award-winning columnist and writer based in Aspen, Colorado. She can be found regularly on the Op-Ed page of The Denver Post. From 2005-2012 her other column, "Meredith Pro Tem" ran in several newspapers, as well as occasionally on The Huffington Post since 2009. Read more about her (or don’t, whatever) at her website. Read bio and latest posts → Read Meredith's latest posts →

« Go back to Mom

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Comments, together with personal information accompanying them, may be used on Babble.com and other Babble media platforms. Learn More.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *.

Previous Post Next Post