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Parents Share Son’s Last, Fatal Text

It isn't worth the risk.

It isn’t worth the risk.

Don’t text and drive.

If we’ve heard it once we’ve heard it a million times and yet many of us aren’t heeding the warning. It’s unfortunate because it seems to me that texting and driving is about a million times worse than not wearing your seatbelt, something that a majority of us are doing after decades of warnings.

Not wearing your seatbelt is passive. If you get in a crash you are likely going to be the only one injured as a result of not clicking it. Not wearing a seatbelt doesn’t affect your driving. Texting, on the other hand, is as bad as drunk driving. You are recklessly driving and could not only hurt or even kill yourself and anyone in your car, but you affect everyone on the roadway.

Unfortunately, the world lost another good person to texting and driving on April 3rd. Alexander Heit was texting a buddy one quick thing when he looked up and saw he’d swerved into oncoming traffic. As Yahoo reports, the 22-year-old over-corrected and rolled his car. He died later at the hospital

Now his parents are sharing his last text, the one he was typing when he crashed, hoping the mundane text will knock some sense into people still clinging to their phones while driving.

Courtesy: Greeley Police

Courtesy: Greeley Police

That. That is what was so important to text that a promising young man lost his life. Those who saw the crash say that Heit was looking down when he drifted into the oncoming lane just outside of Greeley where he attended the University of Northern Colorado.

Police say Heit had a spotless driving record and wasn’t speeding.

“In a split second you could ruin your future, injure or kill others, and tear a hole in the heart of everyone who loves you,” his mom, Sharon Heit, says.

Think about that the next time you reach for your cell while driving. Especially those of you with other little lives in the car.

Top photo: digitaltrends.com

You can also find Monica on her personal blog, The Girl Who.

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