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Would You Rather Talk About Birds and the Bees Than Science?

A survey of parents in Ireland shows that they “would rather their children asked them where babies come from than why the sky is blue.”

It’s not because having “the talk” with your kids is easy, but because “parents dread being asked science-based questions, with nearly one in five hardly ever talking to their offspring about the subject.”

My 4-year-old asked me the other day what teeth were made of, so I took a stab.  “Well, teeth are similar to bone,” I said.  “So they’re made of calcium, and some other stuff, and the shiny, outer part of your teeth is called enamel.”  Not too shabby!  But as for why the sky is blue?  I was always told it was because God made it that way.  Of course I know it has something to do with the refraction of light.  God’s light.  From heaven.  Which is also where babies come from.

The Shell Education Service poll reveals that a third of parents don’t know how to respond to that age-old question about the sky, and “more than one in five said they would struggle with ‘Why does the car work?’”  That’s easy.  Because Mommy stopped spending money on booze and bought gas instead!  Oh no… no, not a good answer.

Other difficult questions for parents: Why can birds fly?  (They have hollow bones?)  What is water made of?  (H20, baby!)  How do fish breathe?  (They don’t once you fry them.)

Amazingly, “Just 1 percent of parents said they would be stumped if asked “Where do babies come from?” the poll found.”  I wonder what 99 percent of those answers sound like.  I have miraculously escaped the actual birds-and-bees part of that question for now.  What have you told your kids about babies?  Also, what’s the biggest number?  Can anything be bigger than the sky?  What did dinosaurs look like?…..

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