Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Pollan’s ‘Food Rules’ Gets Rave Reviews — Sneak a Peek

pollan-artHave you had a chance to read Michael Pollan’s latest book, “Food Rules” yet? If not, you’d better put it on reserve at the library or head to the bookstore because it’s getting rave reviews all over the place. Longtime New York Times nutrition writer Jane Brody (who wrote a pretty great book on nutrition herself) even called it the most intelligent, sensible and simple-to-follow book she’s seen in her more than 4 decades writing about health.

That’s a pretty ringing endorsement, given that Pollan is a journalist, not a nutrionist. Of course, his entertaining, intelligently humorous style and ability to coin phrases like “edible foodlike substance” to describe a great deal of what’s in the grocery store these days probably has a lot to do with his popularity. Interested in getting a little taste of “Food Rules”? Check out our excerpt from the book here and a 2006 interview with Pollan here.

The book lays out a series of simple, easy to follow rules that will improve not only your eating, but the overall state of the planet. For example, he encourages us to (mostly) not buy or eat food we see advertised on television. Think about that, and next time you watch TV keep an eye out for the kind of food commercials you see. You’ll notice fast food, diet food, horrible food-ish things aimed at kids, but very little that’s actually good for you or has lots of inherent nutrition.

As parents, what we feed kids has a lasting impact on their health. There are probably not many super-healthy eaters who grew up on diets of fast food and Hamburger Helper, and probably not a lot of Twinkie-gorgers who grew up eating lots of fruits and veggies and few, if any processed foods. I’m thinking “Food Rules” could help all of us get over the obsession and just…eat.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest