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Quiz: Are You the Work-at-Home Type?

As a parent, working successfully from home requires the ability to balance two competing priorities both which are staring you in the face simultaneously. You also need to be able to work well with little or no face time with colleagues and supervisors. Think you have the chops to walk the tightrope alone and not fall off? Take our quiz to see how you might fare.

1. You are working on a project when you hear your child crying in another room where you know they are being supervised by a responsible adult. You:

A. Drop what you are doing to check in and make sure the situation is addressed before it gets worse.

B. Wait to see if the cries turn into wails before taking a peek.

C. Let the adult who is supervising handle it. You will only get involved if there is blood.

2. The office holiday party is scheduled for the same day as your child’s school show. You:

A. Go to the party and makes sure someone who loves your child is in the audience, armed with a video camera so that you can watch it later with your child.

B. Happily go to your child’s show because you hate those office parties anyway. Now you have a good excuse.

C. Try to make it to both events, missing substantial portions of each but successfully showing your face for a period of time.

3. It is 4:30 p.m. and you have an important deadline in the morning. You have at least four more hours of work to complete the project. You:

A. Stop working at 5:00 p.m., spend time with the family and then, once the kids are in bed, work until 1:00 a.m.

B. Call and ask for an extension until tomorrow afternoon.

C. Work past 5:00 and through dinner because you can’t relax with the project hanging over your head.

4. Which of the following work projects is most appealing to you?

A. A longer term project for which you are solely responsible.

B. A group effort that requires consensus and the bringing together of work and ideas.

C. A combination of both individual and team efforts.

5. How do you like to communicate best with others?

A. In person

B. Telephone

C. Email

6. A large but important project is coming down the pike and has yet to be assigned. You:

A. Raise your hand to lead it; you always like a challenge.

B. Offer to help if needed.

C. Make yourself invisible.

7. You get an email from a colleague that is written in all capital letters. You:

A.Wonder why he is “yelling” at you and spend the rest of the day thinking about what you could have possibly done wrong.

B. Reply back to him in caps asking, “WHY ARE YOU YELLING AT ME?”

C. Pick up the phone and call him to straighten it out person to person.

8. It has been a few days since you have heard from your boss. You view this as:

A. A welcome rest; you take it when you can get it.

B. A sign you are about to get canned; you begin to update your resume.

C. An uncomfortable pause; you call your boss to check in and see what’s happening.

9. During work hours, the phone rings and you see it is your closest friend from college. You:

A. Anxiously pick up the phone and talk for the next thirty minutes.

B. Pick it up and ask if you can call him or her back when you are done work.

C. Let the call go to voicemail and make a note to call back later in the evening.

10. Which is more important to you during the day?

A. A change of scenery.

B. A change of pace.

C. I don’t like change.

11. Which area do you question yourself the most?

A. My abilities as a professional.

B. My abilities as a parent.

C. Both parent and professional equally.

For each of the following statements, select how often each applies to you: (always, sometimes, never)

12. I have a hard time focusing on projects until the deadline is upon me.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

13. I work best under pressure.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

14. Praise for a job well done is important to me.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

15. I like to multi-task.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

16. I have a hard time ignoring housework that is piling up.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

17. When working on a project, I value the input of others.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

18. I enjoy working in my profession.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

19. I enjoy socializing with colleagues from work.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

20. I feel guilty that I don’t spend enough time with my family.

A. Always

B. Sometimes

C. Never

Scoring Guide

Question

A

B

C

Your Score

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1

5

3

1

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2

1

5

3

lightdivider.gif

3

3

5

1

lightdivider.gif

4

1

5

3

lightdivider.gif

5

1

3

5

lightdivider.gif

6

1

3

5

lightdivider.gif

7

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

8

3

5

1

lightdivider.gif

9

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

10

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

11

1

5

3

lightdivider.gif

12

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

13

1

3

5

lightdivider.gif

14

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

15

1

3

5

lightdivider.gif

16

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

17

5

3

1

lightdivider.gif

18

1

3

5

lightdivider.gif

19

5

3

1

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20

5

3

1

Results:

Score between 75-100 – Working from home is a possibility for everyone but you may need to make some significant adjustments to make it work. The most difficult aspects of working from home for you will likely be to stay focused on the task at hand, especially when no one is watching you. Carving out private physical space away from the noise of your family and establishing your own practices to stay in touch and on time with work will be tremendously helpful. Set deadlines and keep them. Arrange for the kids to be out of earshot while you are working, if at all possible. And make it a habit to connect with someone from work everyday to discuss what you are doing. These practices may not come naturally but if you stick to them, you can establish the right environment to thrive.

Score between 46-74 – You seem to have an equal balance of commitment to your family and your profession which bodes extremely well for working from home. You realize that there is tremendous give and take between the two competing priorities. Chances are you will be very successful in your home office but that doesn’t mean you won’t ever feel guilty about coming up short on either end of the spectrum. Guilt is a given, no matter how smooth you are. Communication with both parties (family and work) is critical to avoid major conflicts. Don’t beat yourself up for playing hooky from work for an hour or two to run an errand, as long as you make it up somewhere along the way and don’t miss deadlines. And when your child complains that you are in your office too much, tell yourself that the alternative of NOT being there is much worse.

Score between 20-45 – You have a great deal of professional drive which can be a very positive thing when working from home. However, your biggest challenge will be that you can never “leave the office” and you might find yourself working too hard to at the expense of your family. This work ethic is indeed important, particularly at the beginning of a work from home arrangement, so that your colleagues know you are serious about your job. But once you prove yourself, you can relax a bit. When the phone is ringing after hours, you don’t always have to pick it up. And during work hours, try not to be chained to your desk. Give yourself a break, stand up, stretch your legs and go hang out with your kids for ten minutes in the middle of the day. Homework does have benefits which you are permitted to reap and still do a great job.

Article Posted 6 years Ago
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