Radiation In Massachusetts Drinking Water

Radiation from Japan has been found in Massachusetts' water supply

When my daughter asked me if the Japanese disaster could affect us here in Boston, I very calmly and surely said no.

I believed it. A disaster half a world away might have far-reaching economic and social effects, but the disaster itself was safely on the other side of the world.

Or so I thought. Now the disaster seems frighteningly close to home. Radiation has turned up in Massachusetts’ drinking water. Most likely the radiation comes from the nuclear disaster in Japan.

Per the Huffington Post:

Health officials said Sunday that one sample of Massachusetts rainwater has registered very low concentrations of radiation, most likely from the Japanese nuclear power plant damaged earlier this month by an earthquake and tsunami.

Health officials said there are no anticipated health problems from this, and they expect it to resolve quickly. The radioactive material they found has a short life of just 8 days.

Water samples have been taken all over the country, and also turned up radioactive material in Nevada and other Western states. Again, they say the radiation is at extremely low levels and poses no health risks.

I wonder if they’re drinking from the tap this week, though. I wonder if I should be. Normally I’m an anti-bottled water crusader, but that Poland Spring stuff is looking good right about now.

Even more than concerns about the miniscule amounts of radiation they’re finding in my backyard, the fact that it’s in my backyard is driving home how serious this disaster is for the Japanese people. They don’t have the luxury of distance, and the radiation that’s showing up in tiny amounts here is a clear, real danger to them.

Will you keep drinking Massachusetts tap water? Are you nervous about radiation from Japan affecting your family?

Photo: jcheng

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