Red, White and Awkward: 10 Fourth of July Photos with More Agita Than A Hot Dog-Eating Champion

It’s simply not the Fourth of July if it’s, say, July 3rd or 5th. Or if someone doesn’t char their fingers on a sparkler or the family dog doesn’t freak out when the fireworks display gets underway and run off in fear until Labor Day.

It’s nice to think it’s one of those holidays where we celebrate our independence from Great Britain and the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

But the folks over at Awkward Family Photos know what the day is really about: people looking uncomfortable wearing horizontal stripes and drinking way too much beer at 11 a.m. on a Thursday when it’s 104 degrees in the shade.

Happy Fourth of July:

  • Awkward Fourth of July 1 of 11
    cover28

    Because undercooked hot dogs and burnt s'mores were what our Founding Fathers fought for.

  • Guitar Hero 2 of 11
    guitar-hero

    Play like no one is watching.

  • Wonder Twins 3 of 11
    wonder-twins1

    Form of: a flag.

     

    Shape of: um, still a flag.

  • Flagwrappers 4 of 11
    flagwrappers

    Wrap party.

  • Stars and Stripes 5 of 11
    stars-and-stripes

    The family that dresses alike . . . . also breeds bunnies. Apparently.

  • Raise Your Hands 6 of 11
    raise-your-hands

    A jazzy Independence Day.

  • Hot Foot 7 of 11
    hot-foot

    Don't try this at home. No, seriously. Don't.

  • Shred, White and Blue 8 of 11
    shred-white-and-blue

    Radical, dude.

  • Show Daddy 9 of 11
    showdaddy

    An all-American family. And a creepy one.

  • The Patriot 10 of 11
    the-patriot

    Pants: optional.

  • Black, White and Blue 11 of 11
    black-white-and-blue

    Deep thoughts.

 

[videopost src='http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0HT8UIADns' width='640' height='400']

 

All images used with permission from Awkward Family Photos

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