Categories
Loading
Welcome to Babble,
Settings
Sign Out

Get the Babble Newsletter!

Already have an account? .

Rich or Rehab: Damien From 'The Omen'

damienyoung1Imagine being four-years-old, auditioning to play the spawn of Satan and actually getting the part. In other words, a filmmaker and a casting director looked at you, as a child, and said, “Yeah, I can see this kid being the antichrist.”

That’s more or less what happened to Harvey Stephens, the young British child who played Damien Thorn in 1976′s “The Omen.” And, as part of our month-long Halloween-themed series of Rich or Rehabs, I have attempted to find out what that little son of a devil has been up to since.

As mentioned before, young Harvey won the opportunity to star opposite Gregory Peck and Lee Remick in “The Omen,” reportedly after convincingly punching the director, Richard Donner, in the testicles during his audition. (For the record, Donner reportedly urged the child to do this, which seems like a weird sort of abuse involving all parties. But whatever.)

It was Stephens’s first major movie role … and also his last. Four years later, he snagged a bit part in a TV movie about painter Paul Gauguin but, despite having earned a Golden Globe nomination for his “Omen” work,  that was more or less the end of his career as a child star. Perhaps directors were a little afraid to hire him, what with his connection to Satan and all.

In any case, he moved on, finished school and — at least according to this item — went to college as well.

More recently, according to his bio on imdb, Stephens has worked as a futures trader in the London stock market and a developer in Kent, England. He is married and a dad. And in 2006, he popped up — in the coveted role of tabloid reporter #3 — in the remake of “The Omen.” But perhaps most happily of all, he has managed to avoid succumbing to the alleged “Curse of the Omen.” Let’s hope that good luck continues for that sweet little spawn of Satan.

damienold

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest
Tagged as: , , , , ,

Use a Facebook account to add a comment, subject to Facebook's Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your Facebook name, profile photo and other personal information you make public on Facebook (e.g., school, work, current city, age) will appear with your comment. Learn More.

FacebookTwitterGoogle+TumblrPinterest