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Rick Santorum Vs. Sesame Street

Sesame Street can totally take Rick Santorum and the Republican Party

Former Republican senator Rick Santorum, who is gearing up for a possible 2012 Republican presidential run, is taking on Sesame Street.

Santorum feels the entire Corporation for Public Broadcasting should be cut. That would gut funding for PBS and NPR, and leave Sesame Street homeless.

Freakish as wanting to cut the funding for Sesame Street might seem, he’s not alone. It’s on the chopping block in the Republican’s proposed budget. The whole party would like to see public broadcasting done away with.

It’s not really Sesame Street the Republicans are targeting, of course, it’s that pesky news organization NPR and it’s tendency to deliver unbiased (or, as they like to imagine it, liberal) news.

Santorum says he thinks it’s unlikely the Republicans will get

their way on this one. He knows, he’s tried before. As he told Fox News:

…the ‘Barney’ contingent came out and the ‘Sesame Street’ contingent came out, and these are programs that are popular among families and so they hit you pretty hard.

Well, yes. These programs are popular among families. That’s a bit of an understatement. Sesame Street has been a staple of American childhood for generations. A good friend of mine once told me she couldn’t date anyone who hadn’t grown up with Sesame Street, because it was such an important cultural touchstone.

Of course families, and everyone who treasures their childhood memories of Big Bird and Grover, rush to the defense of Sesame Street.

Fortunately, Santorum is unlikely ever to have the power to do much to push forward his anti-Sesame Street agenda. Rick Santorum may be thinking about running for president, but he’ll have some major obstacles in his path. Not least: his name has been immortalized by Dan Savage for, well, just Google it.

Photo:Evelyn Giggles

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